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dsearle

Utility or Domestic

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Hi. I finished college in June and during that time also worked with a local one man band. I was fortunate to get employed straight out of college with a Utility cutting firm. My question is who here has switched one way or another and although it is great for my development at the moment and I'm climbing regularly and increasing my saw handling skills but I am wondering if it is possible to really become a quality arborist in utility. We do few proper dismantles and little rigging which at some point I feel I will have to become competent in.

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Utility is rarely tasty here.... though the boss does private jobs and is extremely tasty. its a pleasure to see the tasty side of the job... I do utility to build experience

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Utility is rarely tasty here.... though the boss does private jobs and is extremely tasty. its a pleasure to see the tasty side of the job... I do utility to build experience

 

I'm struggling to understand the meaning of "tasty" in this post :lol:

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Utility is good for getting some experience loike the op states. But domestic is generally more challenging and pays alot more in my opinion.

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Hi. I finished college in June and during that time also worked with a local one man band. I was fortunate to get employed straight out of college with a Utility cutting firm. My question is who here has switched one way or another and although it is great for my development at the moment and I'm climbing regularly and increasing my saw handling skills but I am wondering if it is possible to really become a quality arborist in utility. We do few proper dismantles and little rigging which at some point I feel I will have to become competent in.

 

I work with both.

Its nice to be able work in both sectors,

 

where are you based?

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I'm struggling to understand the meaning of "tasty" in this post :lol:

 

in ireland can mean neat or to a good standard

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Use it as a place to get good experience, exactly like you said in your original post, just keep in mind though that there is a difference between the 'arborists' and the Sean HH of the world (he will give me a bollocking if he see's that haha) pick up good tips and tricks just remember the things that you probably shouldn't be doing. That said I have never done utility work.

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Doing utility you'll get loads of practise cutting thorn/mixed hedge. Every now and then a tree. The good thing about utility is that because you mostly do awkward trees that are covered in ivy, surrounded by thorn, on steep banks and in hedges you begin to really appreciate the nice symmetrical garden trees a lot more.

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New to this forum, but had to put my thoughts in here.

 

I began in Utility (25 years ago), then bounced between residential and back to Utility through my career (mainly with one company). But now that I have aged, I find that having started in Utility was a good choice.

 

My reasoning is that with the area I have worked Canada mainly (but North American for storms and such) I find that my experience is more sot after in the powerline section.

As well when working utility and you have a mistake it usually has a shocking repercussion (sorry had to :). So I found that I was even more cautious on my day to day workings.

 

Not to say res does not have it's issues or possibility of large issues to happen. But as a instructor now, I see more people from res coming into my line of work. From that I hear a lot of discussion on how they wished they came through utility to start their careers.

 

Plus also as a trainer having a lot of experience in many facets of the trade is a good thing as it makes you more adaptable to different training that a client would ask for.

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