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Steve Bullman

Arbtalk fungi guide

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1-2. False Saffron Milk Cap Lactarius deterrimus

Mycorrhizal with conifers.

Near Shap, Cumbria 

3-5. Jelly Tooth Pseudohydnum gelatinosum

Saprobic on fallen conifer timber, particularly spruces. The common name is apt! Uncommon.

Near Shap, Cumbria 

6-7. Shield Pinkgill Entoloma clypeatum.

Thought to be mycorrhizal with Rosaceae shrubs esp Hawthorn. Grassy spots and appears in spring. Uncommon.

Wells, Somerset 

8. One of the magnificent (and in some cases deadly poisonous) Amanita bunch.

The small, pointed veil remnants on the cap, slightly greenish, sickly-looking taint to the gills, habitat, and strong unpleasant smell (detergent/chemical) of this all (off) white fungus make it Amanita echinocephala.

At the boundary of it’s European range in southern England and usually described as uncommon/rare in guides. However, in areas perfectly suited to it’s preferences (mature beech woodland on well-drained, limey soils), it can be locally frequent. I’ve seen quite a few times around the Cotswold hills.

Mycorrhizal with Beech.

Near Stroud, Glos

9. White Dapperling Leucoagaricus leucothites.

All white species resembling an Amanita occurring in grassy places. The little village churchyard where these were found was dotted white all over. A superb fungus spectacle of around 150 mushrooms!

Saprobic.

Near Marlborough, Wiltshire

10. Grey Shag Coprinopsis cinerea. An ink cap species that favours decomposing substrates. These were found among the urine-drenched straw, sawdust, rabbit ‘croutons’ and other detritus thrown out of a pet’s hutch.

Thornbury, South Glos

 

Do speak up if I’m droning on and getting annoying won’t you folks!

Thanks ? 

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Just out for my Govt-permitted daily exercise and found these (mycorrhizal) St George’s Mushrooms Calocybe gambosum among the longer grass at the edge of a city cricket pitch.
A frequent find in my area (but apparently not everywhere)  and having flicked back through, it looks like a new addition to the thread.

Nothing particularly rare or unusual turned up so far at this location but I’ve previously found a fair range; Ganoderma australe, White Dapperling, Xerocomellus, Boletus, Bolete Mould, Yellow Stainer, Shaggy Parasol, Clustered Domecap, Psathyrella, Oyster, Field Blewit, Tricholoma, Ramaria, The Blusher and Fairy Ring Champignon to name a few off the top of my head. Very good considering the size of the site.

Anyway, having followed best practice, I’ve taken only enough for a single meal/left the emergent young ones, I’m off home.

Yum!?

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On 24/04/2020 at 14:56, Ben R said:

Just out for my Govt-permitted daily exercise and found these (mycorrhizal) St George’s Mushrooms Calocybe gambosum among the longer grass at the edge of a city cricket pitch.
A frequent find in my area (but apparently not everywhere)  and having flicked back through, it looks like a new addition to the thread.

Nothing particularly rare or unusual turned up so far at this location but I’ve previously found a fair range; Ganoderma australe, White Dapperling, Xerocomellus, Boletus, Bolete Mould, Yellow Stainer, Shaggy Parasol, Clustered Domecap, Psathyrella, Oyster, Field Blewit, Tricholoma, Ramaria, The Blusher and Fairy Ring Champignon to name a few off the top of my head. Very good considering the size of the site.

Anyway, having followed best practice, I’ve taken only enough for a single meal/left the emergent young ones, I’m off home.

Yum!?

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I like a St Georges lightly fried in some garlic butter .  Think it was St. Georges day on the 23rd as it goes ...

Edited by Stubby
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Hello again folks

Frequently listed as 'uncommon' in the books, but find the habitat, find the species. The Tiger Sawgill Lentinus tigrinus - which occurs on Salix - likes it wet, VERY wet. It's even seen on sodden, half submerged logs.

It was abundant beneath a boardwalk on flood meadows near Gloucester on Friday. White blobs everywhere i looked - on both standing trees and fallen wood. Very chuffed to find it and it certainly brightened up walking in the rain.

Examine the edge of the gills with a hand lens and the 'sawgill' part of it's common name makes sense. Less sure about the 'tiger' bit!

Look for gregarious fairly small (up to 10-12 cm) mushrooms with depressed/funnel-shaped white caps bearing attractive red-brown apressed scales. The gills are closely packed and run down the short, thin stem a bit (decurrent).  Always on Willows - far as i know.

Related to Shiitake.

Cheers

Ben

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Hard to imagine a more revolting mushroom than one that looks like it's been dipped in snot -

the slimy-as-you-like Larch Bolete Suillus grevillei:

 

  

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Just had some photos retrieved from a old, scrapped laptop, so here's a few more for the album. All are uncommon/rare.

First up, on - i think - Beech, the stunning crust (or 'resupinate') fungus, Blue Cobalt Crust Terana caerulea. Once seen, never forgotten...

2. One of the Parasol Mushroom clan found on unimproved grassland - Macrolepiota excoriata. Similar to the 'regular' Parasol Mushroom Macrolepiota procera which occurs in the same type of habitat,  but note the cap surface which 'excoriates' (blisters) away from the margin (often in one piece). My suspected ID was later confirmed by microscopy.

3. Also found on ancient rough grassland, Spotted Blewit Lepista panaeolus. This often has scurfy spots on the cap and only the vaguest hints of the violet colours seen in other Blewit species. Other than that, quite similar though; if you know Wood and Field Blewits quite well, you'll probably recognise it as one of that group if you come across it.

4. Warted Amanita Amanita strobiliformis is usually found in ancient woodland and looks similar to (my previously posted) Amanita echinocephala. However, it has large, flat scales on the cap rather than small spiky ones and as you can see, a rather ragged/shabby look about it.

Cheers

Ben

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Found these attractive Mosaic Puffballs Handkea utriformis on rough grassland yesterday:
 
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Great find Ben.

Very interesting! Thanks for sharing

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Just had some photos retrieved from a old, scrapped laptop, so here's a few more for the album. All are uncommon/rare.
First up, on - i think - Beech, the stunning crust (or 'resupinate') fungus, Blue Cobalt Crust Terana caerulea. Once seen, never forgotten...
2. One of the Parasol Mushroom clan found on unimproved grassland - Macrolepiota excoriata. Similar to the 'regular' Parasol Mushroom Macrolepiota procera which occurs in the same type of habitat,  but note the cap surface which 'excoriates' (blisters) away from the margin (often in one piece). My suspected ID was later confirmed by microscopy.
3. Also found on ancient rough grassland, Spotted Blewit Lepista panaeolus. This often has scurfy spots on the cap and only the vaguest hints of the violet colours seen in other Blewit species. Other than that, quite similar though; if you know Wood and Field Blewits quite well, you'll probably recognise it as one of that group if you come across it.
4. Warted Amanita Amanita strobiliformis is usually found in ancient woodland and looks similar to (my previously posted) Amanita echinocephala. However, it has large, flat scales on the cap rather than small spiky ones and as you can see, a rather ragged/shabby look about it.
Cheers
Ben
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A great selection

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