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Steve Bullman

Arbtalk fungi guide

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Hi youngsbury

It''s an 'Earthstar' (Geastrum) but there are a number of lookalikes so it's difficult to say which species it is.

Very nice.

 

Cheers

Ben

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30 minutes ago, Ben R said:

Here's a rare one for the pot - Satan's Bolete Rubroboletus satanus. Found on calcareous soils and mycorrhizal with Oak.?

 

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Nice find

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11 hours ago, Ben R said:

Here's a rare one for the pot - Satan's Bolete Rubroboletus satanus. Found on calcareous soils and mycorrhizal with Oak.?

 

P8020081.JPG

That's a biggun!

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Yes, but believe it or not a couple of specimens were twice the size. It's a big fungus.

 

Here's another rare beauty - once seen, never forgotten! 

Blue Cobalt Crust (Terana caerulea). Saprobic on dead hardwoods (here Beech). Stroud, Glos.

 

The second fungus is a rare/uncommon Ganoderma species - G. lucidum. Told by the kidney shape, reddish upper surface and the thin, knobbly, finger-like stem. Found on an old hardwood stump (Oak i think) near Ledbury, Herefordshire. Saprobic or parasitic.

 

Last pic shows a species to look out for from anytime soon - Poplar Fieldcap (Cyclocybe cylindracea). These were found in May 2016 near Newent, Glos. Despite the common name, it doesn't occur exclusively on Poplus.

 

 

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5 hours ago, Ben R said:

Yes, but believe it or not a couple of specimens were twice the size. It's a big fungus.

 

Here's another rare beauty - once seen, never forgotten! 

Blue Cobalt Crust (Terana caerulea). Saprobic on dead hardwoods (here Beech). Stroud, Glos.

 

The second fungus is a rare/uncommon Ganoderma species - G. lucidum. Told by the kidney shape, reddish upper surface and the thin, knobbly, finger-like stem. Found on an old hardwood stump (Oak i think) near Ledbury, Herefordshire. Saprobic or parasitic.

 

Last pic shows a species to look out for from anytime soon - Poplar Fieldcap (Cyclocybe cylindracea). These were found in May 2016 near Newent, Glos. Despite the common name, it doesn't occur exclusively on Poplus.

 

 

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Terana caerulea is pretty interesting. Not seen that and the G. species is also pretty interesting.

 

Thanks for sharing. 

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Cheers AJ. 

 

A few more for ya

 

1. Leafy Brain (Tremella foliacea). Parasitic on another fungus - Hairy Curtain Crust (stop sniggering!) 

2 & 3. Spotted Blewit (Lepista panaeola). Grows in clusters or trooping on ancient, unimproved grassland. The                  scurfy 'spots' on the caps are a good species indicator. Uncommon.

4. Bay Polypore (Polyporus durus). Saprobic on fallen hardwoods esp Beech. There are other similar, related               species but they don't grow as large.

5. Bulbous Honey Fungus (Armillaria gallica). Whitish above the short-lived stem ring, concolorous with cap               below, very swollen stem base.

6 & 7. Peppery Roundhead (Stropharia pseudocyanea). Smaller size and peppery scent distinguishes it from

            related lookalikes. Found in short grass habitats (here a churchyard). Saprobic. 

 

 

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31 minutes ago, Ben R said:

Cheers AJ. 

 

A few more for ya

 

1. Leafy Brain (Tremella foliacea). Parasitic on another fungus - Hairy Curtain Crust (stop sniggering!) 

2 & 3. Spotted Blewit (Lepista panaeola). Grows in clusters or trooping on ancient, unimproved grassland. The                  scurfy 'spots' on the caps are a good species indicator. Uncommon.

4. Bay Polypore (Polyporus durus). Saprobic on fallen hardwoods esp Beech. There are other similar, related               species but they don't grow as large.

5. Bulbous Honey Fungus (Armillaria gallica). Whitish above the short-lived stem ring, concolorous with cap               below, very swollen stem base.

6 & 7. Peppery Roundhead (Stropharia pseudocyanea). Smaller size and peppery scent distinguishes it from

            related lookalikes. Found in short grass habitats (here a churchyard). Saprobic. 

 

 

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056.JPG

IMG_3680.JPG

IMG_3872.JPG

IMG_4169.JPG

IMG_4188.JPG

Very nice. Are these all recent finds or photos over time? 

 

Really interesting ones in there. Haven't had a chance to see most those yet. But gotta keep lookin

Edited by AJStrees
addition to response

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