Jump to content

Using a MEWP as an overhead anchor?


benedmonds
 Share

Recommended Posts

Has anyone used tracked MEWPs as an overhead anchor? I have used a vehicle mount in the past when spraying bunkers. In that case it was only there as backup but we have to remove some vegetation from a derelict building and would like to use the MEWP above as an anchor allowing us to work below  using a rope and harness. It would not be used for lifting and no weight other than the climber would be applied. It would be useful to actually abseil off the MEWP down into the building.   The waste could go out from the bottom once cut.

 

The IPAF says not recommended and only in "exceptional circumstances" with express written approval of the manufacturer.  (I have emailed the manufacturer)

https://www.ipaf.org/sites/default/files/2022-02/Do not use MEWPs as an Overhead Anchor (TE-997-0721-1-en).pdf

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Log in or register to remove this advert

I think you would have to be very careful about dynamic loading - even just stopping abruptly when abseiling will significantly increase the force on the MEWP compared to a static load (ie that which would arise when stood in the bucket/basket).

 

Needless to say, you would also want to check with your insurers too.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I can't remember using my MEWP as an overhead anchor in the past, but I have on more then one occasion climbed onto the plinth around a church spire/tower while still attached to the MEWP basket, or onto chimney cappings when removing vegetation. Of course, no organisation is likely to endorse this in our current litigious society. I suppose if a very heavy worker started swinging on the rope under the MEWP and got far enough out with a swing they might exceed the "safe working load" for the machine. But then what fool would do such a thing?!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Just moving up and down on a rope can mean that the dynamic forces are up to twice that of the static force.

 

The following is a video I took when operating a cableway that is used to measure river flow.  I was winding a 50kg weight out and back, and had installed a calibrated load cell inbetween the weight and the suspension cable.

 

Just moving out and back the maximum observed force was 81kg.  When we changed mode and lifted/lowered the weight we quickly exceeded this, topping out at 88kgf (from a 50kg weight remember).

 

Yes the SWL of the MEWP should take account of this, but whatever you do the factors of safety are going to be significantly reduced.

 

 

Edited by waterbuoy
correct typo in weight
  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

It would depend on the machine, Ben.

 

Most manufacturers would not recommend it, however I do regular work with one that is lolered for lifting. You remove the basket and put a hook on the jib, and it's rated to lift around 250kgs. It's a 25m mewp with up to 12m outreach I think.

 

He's pretty close to you I think, CV23 postcode

 

Drop me a message if you want to know more m

Link to comment
Share on other sites

A crane, in effect, presumably the SWL reduces with outreach.

 

Need to think this one through carefully and perhaps a proper crane is the best / better solution.

 

Coming at this from an industry guidance perspective - the MEWP as an anchor is contrary to TG5 (sect. 5.1.3l) , and therefore unwise as such, the use of a crane is a better option (TG4 Sect. 7.4), ideally used for tree crown access but short-duration(?) works suspended from the hook can be undertaken (ideally using a carrier / basket.)

 

Maybe worth engaging an advisor to draw up a suitable RAMS etc.

 

Go safe..   

Link to comment
Share on other sites

10 minutes ago, AA Teccie (Paul) said:

A crane, in effect, presumably the SWL reduces with outreach.

 

Need to think this one through carefully and perhaps a proper crane is the best / better solution.

 

Coming at this from an industry guidance perspective - the MEWP as an anchor is contrary to TG5 (sect. 5.1.3l) , and therefore unwise as such, the use of a crane is a better option (TG4 Sect. 7.4), ideally used for tree crown access but short-duration(?) works suspended from the hook can be undertaken (ideally using a carrier / basket.)

 

Maybe worth engaging an advisor to draw up a suitable RAMS etc.

 

Go safe..   

Cranes typically aren't LOLERed sufficiently for lifting people. A MEWP is. As I said in my previous post. Some manufacturers guidelines will allow this if the machine has an appropriate attachment point for a rope (not just over the basket rail) but most aren't designed for this purpose.

 

With the machine I use the SWL is constant throughout the outreach of the machine.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

  •  

  • Featured Adverts

About

Arbtalk.co.uk is a hub for the arboriculture industry in the UK.  
If you're just starting out and you need business, equipment, tech or training support you're in the right place.  If you've done it, made it, got a van load of oily t-shirts and have decided to give something back by sharing your knowledge or wisdom,  then you're welcome too.
If you would like to contribute to making this industry more effective and safe then welcome.
Just like a living tree, it'll always be a work in progress.
Please have a look around, sign up, share and contribute the best you have.

See you inside.

The Arbtalk Team

Follow us

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.