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Hunny fungus and tpo

Is this hunny fungus

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Hi I hope this is something you can help with. 
12 years ago i had a huge mature oak tree, (estimated 95 tonnes had TPO) The base was rotting in places and started to sprout mushrooms from it’s base. These were sent to a laboratory by the council TO and identified as collybia fusipes. The tree was considered dangerous and felled with TO approval. 
The council insisted that I replant oak in the same position. - this made no sense to me as the ground is infected but I went ahead as per their wishes. 
however each year since then clumps of mushrooms have been sprouting at this time of year, and over the years we are getting more mushrooms. To the point that this year the mushrooms are growing out of my garden wall, from the base of my adjacent hedge and under large laurel / holly specimens and there are loads if them. 

can anyone identify if this is the original collybia or could it be hunny fungus ? 
And what can I do to stop this from continuing to get worse  ? 
also the new oak has a TPO so I can’t peel back the bark or dig up the roots to look for Other signs to help identify this mushroom. 
i can provide more pics if needed many thanks for your help ! 

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How healthy does the new tree look?

 

This is my understanding as a woodland owner with a large amount of honey fungus about the place. In your pic the honey fungus is likely to be decomposing the old oak roots so I doubt there's much you can sensibly do. In a garden situation you are told to remove old stumps and roots and leave the area fallow for a year or so, but as the new tree has been planted I don't think there's much that can be done other than look after the tree.

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The tree has some leaves that have died back / yellowed prematurely, but I don’t think it’s going to die any time soon. I’ve been watching the fungus for years now and  The problem for me is that the fungus is spreading and now infected the hedge, and has sprouted mushrooms on the other side of the garden.  I really don’t want it to spread to the whole garden (I’d like to keep the oak which has a tpo and is planted immediately adjacent to where the mature oak stump was ground out) 
 

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My understanding of HF is that it's more a scavenger than a primary predator.  If you keep your garden healthy - mulching annually for example, ensuring drainage is good, using chemicals sparingly and preferably not at all - most plants should keep it at bay.  When a plant weakens due to stress from any cause HF will pounce.

The fungus and its spores are everywhere; don't feel it's picking on you.

I don't know about laurel's susceptibility but if you have Cotoneasters I believe they are a favourite of HF.

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I don't know if you've already looked at the RHS advice but they have a good list of susceptible and resistant plants here: https://www.rhs.org.uk/advice/pdfs/honey-fungus-host-list general advice here: https://www.rhs.org.uk/advice/garden-health/disease/Honey-fungus and how to manage outbreaks here: https://www.rhs.org.uk/advice/profile?pid=1015

 

Interestingly is shows privet as very susceptible and we have a fair bit of it growing well in the garden and a fair bit of honey fungus as well.

 

I'm trying to get on top of the fungus by cultivating the soil. First year of growing spuds was a little worrying as the fungus attacks the tubers but subsequent years have been much better.

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Thank you for the links they’re very helpful. Because the tree has a tpo on it I don’t think I can dig near it’s roots so was at a bit of a loss if there was anything I could do. The hedge next to the tree is very mixed yew /holly/ hawthorn / oak / laurel !! It has absolutely loads of the mushrooms under it but still looks ok. 
I think the tree is ok (it’s 12 years old) it does have a bit of dead wood / a small mushroom (which doesn’t look like hunny fungus) growing from the base and the bark is splitting.... is this ok ? 

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I would guess the fungus isn't just spreading randomly looking for victims rather it is consuming the roots of the old oak tree, which indeed go right across the garden.

 

It will die back when the food is used but as others have said there are spores everywhere anyway so not really a special risk by having these fruiting bodies come up.

 

I think at 12 years a bit of deadwood is normal, it should be just losing branches as it goes taller. If you want to do the best for the tree then maybe get someone properly knowledgeable to have a look if any formative pruning would be a benefit, I can't immediately see anything in the pictures but a few cuts at this age can sometimes a avoid a big problem later on.

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Thank you for the links they’re very helpful. Because the tree has a tpo on it I don’t think I can dig near it’s roots so was at a bit of a loss if there was anything I could do. The hedge next to the tree is very mixed yew /holly/ hawthorn / oak / laurel !! It has absolutely loads of the mushrooms under it but still looks ok. 
I think the tree is ok (it’s 12 years old) it does have a bit of dead wood / a small mushroom (which doesn’t look like hunny fungus) growing from the base and the bark is splitting.... is this ok ? 

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