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Do foresters / cutters work until retirement til mid-60s or is the work too physically demanding to last that long? If that's the case then what do you do once you're too knackered to fell at pace anymore?

 

Is there much scope for going into woodland management, forest officer, or estate work for a more cushy lifestyle?

 

For my part, I'm 31 been doing arb in a city for a year and enjoying it, but had a week of removing Sitka regen (weeding with chainsaws) on Highland hills in driving rain - not nice, but one day we felled small sitkas (40ft or so) and loved it. After snedding up I couldn't wait to get onto the next tree. Definitely my gut is telling me that felling in the forest is where I belong! Not sure on my longevity in this specific line of work though... But perhaps opportunities will come along.

 

Advice appreciated!

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Bloke I know who's 60 and still felling in the woods. Seems it's much more about how you look after yourself than anything else. That said almost every contracts manager/forester I've met was an older chap with lots of hands on experience so anecdotally I guess one thing would lead to another 

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I'm 50yrs old and my body hurts  really hurts.  Can't see me doing it much past 55. 

I do domestic tree surgery and forestry. 

 

Must admit I've enjoyed it all really.  But think I'll pay for it when really old 

Edited by otter
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Definately learn the timber handling skills plus safe felling  , very easy to knacker yrself up. But then it's like most manual jobs like that. Watch yr back and yr hands. Probably safer now than it was. K

Edited by Khriss
Saw with heated grips is a must in winter

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7 hours ago, otter said:

I'm 50yrs old and my body hurts  really hurts.  Can't see me doing it much past 55. 

I do domestic tree surgery and forestry. 

 

Must admit I've enjoyed it all really.  But think I'll pay for it when really old 

With you on this one. The body can only take so much and tried to look after myself where possible.Normally go to my physio every 6/8 weeks which does benefit me massively.Body is screaming for a treatment now but due to lock down not been able to see anyone 😫Restoring an old chair for his wife this week so fingers crossed 😄 Then the pubs open and some sort of normality.

Edited by topchippyles

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On 22/06/2020 at 08:37, Khriss said:

Definately learn the timber handling skills plus safe felling  , very easy to knacker yrself up. But then it's like most manual jobs like that. Watch yr back and yr hands. Probably safer now than it was. K

Yeah seems like whichever manual trade you're in some part of the body has to pay - I also do landscaping on new build sites - one day I choose to sacrifice the knees, another day it's the back's turn...But need that sweet dollar! Might as well enjoy what I'm doing for it tho

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23 hours ago, Khriss said:

Course when yr completely worn out - Spain looking fr a good painting restorer...... It can't be THAT hard, Shirley ! 

 

 

WWW.BBC.CO.UK

Despite two attempts to fix it, the Bartolomé Esteban Murillo painting has been left unrecognisable.

 

 

 

K

Ha haa I reckon I'm in there...so long forestry!

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Oh yes you can do it, and enjoy it at your age, but as the years roll by your body will tell you otherwise.
If you’re hand cutting as fast as you can safely go, in debilitating heat, or pouring rain or frozen stiff,by the time you’re 50 you’ll want to be out of it.
There are exceptions I know, but by then most have adopted that familiar walk which conceals a bad back, and bad everything else.

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I'm 57 and look at a fellow sawman who is 74 and after a broken pelvis about 4/5 years ago he still works all the days he gets and still milks a small dairy herd. It's as much about what  you want to do and not looking at what can stop you doing it ?

I've been cutting timber for around 30 years and have all the bits broken and worn, detached bicep muscle along with mild arthritis in my hands and yes the mandatory bad back but I would not want another way of making a living. To say you will be worn out by X yrs is an individual view, however being eaten alive by horseflies and the like during summer and soaked etc during the winter is not to everyone's taste !

I'm not saying I'm special far from it  ! I just do what I want to do and it's not for every one  ….Oh and don't think you'll get rich during the process !

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