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jorgon1022

Im new to the business and never climbed before. I really need advice

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3 days? For some reason I got the impression it would be much longer. 3 days is not really enough to start, I think. To get a "comprehensive" crash course in beginner's arb in the UK you are looking at about a month's worth of training, plus assessment, if you want to train up to an "insurable" standard. If you're getting one on one attention, I suppose you could learn to climb in 3 days, but there's a lot more to it than that. What kind of arb work is around your area? Iowa is mostly open flatlands, isn't it? Any logging? Parks maintenance, domestic tree care, etc?

 

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On 08/05/2019 at 21:18, Jwoodgardenmaintenance said:

Have you not seen Human on YouTube? Just like what your describing and the best thing with Corey is any mistakes he makes he shows doesn't edit them out 

 

Jack 

 

On 08/05/2019 at 21:26, Haironyourchest said:

Yeah I follow him too, not my favorite, due the the hammer and sickle tattoo on his arm. But fair dues, he does put it all out there. The broken TIP = broken pelvis episode was an eye opener!

 

Please don't follow anything 'Human' posts on Youtube. He hasn't got a clue and shouldn't be making videos. It baffles me why he has such a following on social media. 

 

Just out of interest, why are you changing careers? 

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As others have said.
If you have the work booked, try and hire an older, seasoned subby climber. This would be the best way to get a ‘mini apprenticeship’. If your fit and 30, you’ve got plenty of years climbing left providing you look after yourself. I’m not sure what tickets you already have but CS30/31 CS38/39 are essentials and CS41 rigging is ideal.
Even if you start with just CS38 (climbing and aerial rescue) to cover the subby, you will still have to do the other tickets to get you working in the tree.
Stay safe.

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4 hours ago, Haironyourchest said:

3 days? For some reason I got the impression it would be much longer. 3 days is not really enough to start, I think. To get a "comprehensive" crash course in beginner's arb in the UK you are looking at about a month's worth of training, plus assessment, if you want to train up to an "insurable" standard. If you're getting one on one attention, I suppose you could learn to climb in 3 days, but there's a lot more to it than that. What kind of arb work is around your area? Iowa is mostly open flatlands, isn't it? Any logging? Parks maintenance, domestic tree care, etc?

 

Years ago there used to be a 10 week intensive course I am sure ....

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15 minutes ago, TIMON said:

As others have said.
If you have the work booked, try and hire an older, seasoned subby climber. This would be the best way to get a ‘mini apprenticeship’. If your fit and 30, you’ve got plenty of years climbing left providing you look after yourself. I’m not sure what tickets you already have but CS30/31 CS38/39 are essentials and CS41 rigging is ideal.
Even if you start with just CS38 (climbing and aerial rescue) to cover the subby, you will still have to do the other tickets to get you working in the tree.
Stay safe. emoji106.png
 

This is one of the problems with today's arb industry. Very few people are prepared to commit a few years to learning the trade. A few short courses and they expect a skilled rate. When they struggle to earn it it its either buy a tipper and chipper, move into utility's or move on to something else entirely. Without any depth of knowledge behind them they take on work they aren't able to do. Then resort to a subby climber to get them out of trouble. The idea of an at best semi skilled climber with very little experience in the rescue climber role turns a good idea into a farce. Yet it is repeated across the industry day in day out. There is no such thing as a "mini apprenticeship". 

Until the trade stops using the Nptc route as the standard it won't improve. Trainers making very good livings delivering poor "short courses" will never be a substitute for real skills obtained through experience. Would some sort of industry wide log book be a realistic way of raising standards ? Apologies for the pessimistic tone but it's something I've witnessed with increasing regularity over the last ten or so years. Hand in hand with properly skilled climbers and cutters becoming increasingly scarce.

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This is one of the problems with today's arb industry. Very few people are prepared to commit a few years to learning the trade. A few short courses and they expect a skilled rate. When they struggle to earn it it its either buy a tipper and chipper, move into utility's or move on to something else entirely. Without any depth of knowledge behind them they take on work they aren't able to do. Then resort to a subby climber to get them out of trouble. The idea of an at best semi skilled climber with very little experience in the rescue climber role turns a good idea into a farce. Yet it is repeated across the industry day in day out. There is no such thing as a "mini apprenticeship". 

Until the trade stops using the Nptc route as the standard it won't improve. Trainers making very good livings delivering poor "short courses" will never be a substitute for real skills obtained through experience. Would some sort of industry wide log book be a realistic way of raising standards ? Apologies for the pessimistic tone but it's something I've witnessed with increasing regularity over the last ten or so years. Hand in hand with properly skilled climbers and cutters becoming increasingly scarce.

 

Much to agree with there, although, not everyone has the opportunity or resources to commit to the long term education/training route. Like someone else has said, we have to start somewhere.

A fair percentage of homeowners/customers (sadly) aren’t really bothered about what is best for the tree, or if the operative is highly educated/trained. They just want to buy more daylight and less leaves to rake up in autumn.

While this is the case, it will always be a race to the bottom.

 

(Edit... Didn’t realise the OP was based in the US)

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23 minutes ago, TIMON said:

 


Much to agree with there, although, not everyone has the opportunity or resources to commit to the long term education/training route. Like someone else has said, we have to start somewhere.
A fair percentage of homeowners/customers (sadly) aren’t really bothered about what is best for the tree, or if the operative is highly educated/trained. They just want to buy more daylight and less leaves to rake up in autumn.
While this is the case, it will always be a race to the bottom.

 

Completely agree regarding domestic work. However the fragmented training system (that is generally in my experience administered by the very people running the businesses delivering it) is partly responsible the situation. A truly independent training route that doesn't  use private businesses to deliver it would be a start. They sell a route into the job that doesn't represent a true picture of day to day realities both physical and mental. If there was a different setup at the top it could lead to an affordable apprenticeship style lifelong learning curve. Instead of the wham bam off you go short course nonsense. But if they can keep putting bums on short course seats then the training gravy train will roll on ? 

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It's pretty crazy that you'll struggle to get a decent tradesman insurance rate for most building trades without an NVQ 2/3 in that trade, but I can get insurance for dismantling a 100ft tree over a listed mansion with a 3 days long rigging ticket.

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