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Spruce Pirate

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About Spruce Pirate

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  • Birthday 03/05/1976

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  1. Plenty of narrow roads on the continent: By now you really should have learned that everything is better up here!!!
  2. FC are now running Peugeot Partners with 4*4 around here. Look good vans, good enough ground clearance, 4*4 if it's a bit greasy. Towing not great obviously, but look good vans for the woods.
  3. Is this like a sweepstake? Is there a prize for closest guess? 15:47 on the 31st of this month - N/S wingmirror.
  4. I think a good assessor will decide whether someone is competent pretty quickly. How a person looks, acts, what condition their kit is in, what kit they've got all help to inform an assessor whether or not the candidate knows what they're doing or not. That is if the assessor themselves knows what they're about. The blethering and having a cup of tea should then confirm experiencea and underlying knowledge. After that a good assessor should know if they need to spend 45 minutes cutting a couple of trees to confirm what they think or whether they want to do lots of trees to make sure someone is actually up to scratch. So either you have a full day cutting getting refreshed or you only do a wee bit followed by a lot of gossip, reminiscing and drinking tea. This last part should still count as refresher as it is more than likely vocational and will cover all sorts of different scenarios and how they were / should have been dealt with. Never underestimate the importance of a good blether!
  5. Dendroctonus micans? Great spruce bark beetle, plenty of info on FC site about them.
  6. Bottle jack and a plate is by far the cheapest option. You can get a Tree Jack, but they're 5*, 6*, 10* the price. As above a slight angle down toward the felling direction helps keep it in place. Back it up with wedges.
  7. It's the last day of my easter "holiday" and I need to be up early tomorrow so I'll re-read your post tomorrow when my brain is working properly. All I can remember right now is that the yield models show as little as 3 years between thinnings for sitka so you're not totally out with going in so soon.
  8. Trouble is....... What is classed as a thinning machine? In Conor's example an Ergo isn't exactly a small machine, certainly not in first thinnings. Put almost any off the shelf machine from any of the big manuracturers into first thinnings and it'll look HUGE. What the manufacturers class as thinnings machines are, in my opinion, really more suited to later thinnings. In order to do first thinnings properly you're looking as specialist small scale machinery (such as yours J) or going back to hand cutting - or a combination of both. Problem then is a lack of funds to cover the costs. Problem if you put machines that are too big in is you end up skinning trees and damaging the ground , you end up with butt rot and potentially unstable crops. The result can be seen all over the place either non-thin regime or a delayed thin, more instability followed by premature clearfell. There's still quite a bit of figuring out to be done in the thinning conundrum, small scale equipment seems to be getting better, but I thing there's still a bit to do to persuade people (owners / investors) that it's worthwhile doing properly. I should add that I'm talking really about upland spruce (sitka) forests, those who are luckier to be lower down with better soils and more diverse crops may be able to make thinnings work easier.
  9. I don't think that's really any new news as far as the industry is concerned. Been found more on native pine largely due to looking for it more rather than any big jump in spread as far as I can see. It is now so endemic in plantation stuff that its no longer surveyed for by the FC in plantations. The native pinewoods it could have an effect on, especially in tight canopys and thicket stages. Stuff we looked at in Tentsmuir Forest a few years ago that was really badly infected and very sparse in needle coverage has recovered very well thanks to intensive thinning to let the air flow through. Native pinewoods with non-intervention managment policies might suffer quite badly if there are areas of dense canopy. On the other hand, as I understand it, it's very rarely fatal to trees so they might be able to withstand it.
  10. Outside the house last year.
  11. Dothistroma has been found on spruces, but not to any significant degree as far as I'm aware. The pictures looks more like Elatobium (spruce aphid) to me, but I'm not totally sure. Could also be wind blast if there's been a particularly cold east wind? Just scrolled up to look at pictures again and saw your post, so yes, I'd agree with that.
  12. Depends on where you are. FCS are now Scottish Forestry or Forestry & Land Scotland, not sure exactly what they're calling themselves, but they're still basically the same organisation. Almost all cutting work with FCS is now on a multi-supplier framework agreement so it depends on who you're working for as to what you'll get as well as what level of skill and experience you bring to it. Our rates with them are pretty healthy, although there's still room for improvement in some areas. Unfortunately the days of being able to rock up to the forest office and pick up a bit of cutting work locally are now long gone so if you're looking for cutting work with the Forestry, certainly in Scotland, you'll need to find out which contractors are on their agreements and get in touch with them.
  13. I've done quite a few of these over the years for different folks. Have used oak, lime, sitka, larch and possible ash, but can't remember for sure. I tend to cut them a few days to a week before they're needed as it lets the fresh smell disipate a wee bit, but keeps them from cracking too quickly. Most folk only want them for single use anyway so if the split in the long run its not a big deal. The spruce ones were for the community council for some event and are stored in our shed, they've stood up surprisingly well with very few split after over a year, they're only about 6" diameter so that might make a difference. Have done some up to about 2' diameter for cake stands, not sure how well they stood the test of time.
  14. It's something that I've often heard quoted Gary, but I've never quite understood as clearly trees have been growing quite happily by themselves for a very, very long time. I think the theory is that by notch planting the roots are put into the ground deeper to start off with but self seeders tend to spread out on the surface more. It is fair to say that this is in the context of conifers rather than broadleaf's. It also assumes that the trees are planted right!

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