Jump to content

MattyF

Veteran Member
  • Posts

    14,276
  • Joined

  • Last visited

  • Days Won

    19

About MattyF

  • Birthday 24/02/1978

Personal Information

  • Location:
    N E
  • Occupation
    Tree worker
  • City
    Hexham

Recent Profile Visitors

8,470 profile views

MattyF's Achievements

Grand Master

Grand Master (14/14)

  • Dedicated Rare
  • First Post
  • Posting Machine Rare
  • Collaborator
  • Very Popular Rare

Recent Badges

  1. It would also depend on the land , I have around 50acres and I would not dream of putting my tractors on it for most of the year as they would destroy it and have whilst feeding cattle in winter …I’ve gone through drains with a 85hp John Deere and relandscaped fields to have small streams through them and mud pits!! only that JD and my Valtra 6400 fit through most of the gates any way. quad bikes and alpine tractor is mostly what I use.
  2. 2511 on a stihl 10” 1/4 pitch bar and chain is with out a doubt the best climbing saw there is currently and has been in my opinion. I would expect a year out of one if used seriously .. but even that would not put me off buying my 4th as power to weight wise and ergonomics you can’t beat it, even a seriously modded 150/151 wont be close performance wise. have not picked up a 201 or 540 well maybes on two three occasions since using the 2511 and my modded 150’s have just been back ups.
  3. Nothing to loose , go for it.
  4. Spaltling is black lines through the timber not heart wood discolouration.
  5. I sold this whole log Dan for £350 … wasn’t really worth the time in milling and 4 years drying, started at £600 after a month I just put a buy it now for that as I needed it gone.
  6. I doubt you would get £150 a log never mind plank…. And it’s not spalted and that’s even if it was spalted! If you sold that to a mill at the quality of those they would give you pit prop money.
  7. Yes always revert back to a vt or variant , just can’t get on with mechanical stuff…
  8. Can't fault the last 2511 I brought ... seems they may have got it together? It may even last more than a year too! 1/4 pitch bar and chain and it's a ripper.. if I had to use one and I have both I would take the 540 though.. in all honesty I've used it twice in a year , I'd rather take the 2511 for reductions and awkward dismantles and swap out to a 550xp once the intricate works done... or just take a bigger saw for felling any way for cut chasing... some thing I've found the 201 incapable and dangerous of attempting to use in those situations.
  9. Leave it there for 3-5 years and it will spalt , then it's worth milling. Beech bars fetch good money but oversized I've seen be virtually given away.
  10. I've never had any bother with dry Douglas , I've got a stack of it and I'll bring it down for various projects for 5 years now... dry larch though !
  11. How did you get on growing the sweet potato ? I tried a few years back and it was an expensive disaster !
  12. Typical guardian article ... load of absolute shite.
  13. Rob D put some pictures up years back of some poplar that had some stunning rippling in he had milled, I'd never seen owt like it any way! Seemed to stand out a lot more than sycamore , I suppose the only down side is it will have dented easily.

About

Arbtalk.co.uk is a hub for the arboriculture industry in the UK.  
If you're just starting out and you need business, equipment, tech or training support you're in the right place.  If you've done it, made it, got a van load of oily t-shirts and have decided to give something back by sharing your knowledge or wisdom,  then you're welcome too.
If you would like to contribute to making this industry more effective and safe then welcome.
Just like a living tree, it'll always be a work in progress.
Please have a look around, sign up, share and contribute the best you have.

See you inside.

The Arbtalk Team

Follow us

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.