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Rory F

Tree Identification

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7 hours ago, Rory F said:

Many thanks for the good advice. The reason I am asking about all this is because we bought a newbuild and originally the tree was a Sorbus Aria but it died. They replaced it and advised it would be replaced with another Sorbus Aria however clearly that hasn't happened as we have a Hazel tree now. We like the idea of a tree and not a bush or shrub and we liked the idea of the white flowers on the Sorbus Aria. Would a Sorbus Aria look much nicer and 'tree like' in your opinion?

Not nicer than some nuts at Christmas though . 🙂

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Think of the difference between a cob nut and a wild hazel as a bit like the difference between a Cox's Orange Pippin apple growing in your garden and a wild seedling growing by the roadside where someone threw a core out of the window. Both produce apples but one is big with a good flavour and the other is probably small and a bit mediocre, but both are apples and both are OK to eat.

 

Cob nuts are commercially grown on a single stem. This means you can do the same to any hazel. They naturally produce lots of small branches from below ground level so you would always need to cut these back, but it's a job done once or twice a year, not a constant battle like mowing the lawn. The normal form is an open centred bush, with a trunk about 3' high and then a goblet shape of branches on top, reaching about 20' high if left alone but can be managed down to 8'. What size, how natural and 'tree like' vs artificially formed you want it is entirely up to you.

 

If you like the hazel, keep it and it will probably do well. They are native, hardy and not very fussy. They do have good catkins, quite nice yellow autumn foliage and are not going to get out of hand beyond the level where you can manage them yourself. And then as Stubby says, some nice nuts for Christmas is always a bonus. However, if you decide you want something else, since you will now have to buy it that does open up more choices. If you post up what you would like out of it - location, size, features etc. then I am sure you will get some good suggestions to consider.


Alec

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Coincidentally my wife just sent me these photos…
This is the Turkish hazel nuts and their unusual cups.
IMG_1631986296.071753.jpgIMG_1631986302.309164.jpg

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32 minutes ago, Dan Maynard said:

I thought you could tell the nuts are nearly ready because the squirrels have had them?

Take a couple of washing up bowls or buckets, fill them with sand, and put them near the tree.

 

The squirrels come along and steal the nuts, then look for somewhere to bury them, and usually choose your bucket. Every couple of days, rake through the top couple of inches and recover the nuts. Why do the hard work of harvesting them if you can get the squirrels to do it for you.

 

The above does not work around here anymore. This is because the squirrels have all come down with a bad case of high velocity lead poisoning.

 

Alec

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Take a couple of washing up bowls or buckets, fill them with sand, and put them near the tree.
 
The squirrels come along and steal the nuts, then look for somewhere to bury them, and usually choose your bucket. Every couple of days, rake through the top couple of inches and recover the nuts. Why do the hard work of harvesting them if you can get the squirrels to do it for you.
 
The above does not work around here anymore. This is because the squirrels have all come down with a bad case of high velocity lead poisoning.
 
Alec

How many trees are planted by squirrels compared to how many they destroy I wonder?

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22 hours ago, Rough Hewn said:


If the nuts in your photos are from your tree,
It’s a wild hazel. Not Turkish.
Turkish hazel has a very strange looking cup, with lots of sticky bits.
emoji106.png

 

14 hours ago, Rough Hewn said:


Cob nuts are domesticated hazel, with longer nuts, much bigger.
emoji106.png

Nice info. I always thought a hazel in our local park was a cob nut, appears it is a Turkish hazel. 👍

 

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How many trees are planted by squirrels compared to how many they destroy I wonder?
I've read that grey's take the nuts before properly mature hence they don't grow, but not sure how accurate that is.
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Take a couple of washing up bowls or buckets, fill them with sand, and put them near the tree.
 
The squirrels come along and steal the nuts, then look for somewhere to bury them, and usually choose your bucket. Every couple of days, rake through the top couple of inches and recover the nuts. Why do the hard work of harvesting them if you can get the squirrels to do it for you.
 
The above does not work around here anymore. This is because the squirrels have all come down with a bad case of high velocity lead poisoning.
 
Alec
I like that plan.

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