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PMcParlin

Seabuckthorn tree leaning into fence/wall

Question

Hello,

 

I have been struggling with trying to find a solution, and really hope someone can help...

 

I have a large Seabuckthorn tree which has leant into my neighbours fence, (pic attached).

 

I need to raise it slightly off the fence and secure it.

 

This is particularly important, as I am planning on having a building near to the tree.  It won't have a concrete base, but be built on posts...but I need to lift and secure the tree.

 

As you can see it has had timber supports, but these have broken during strong winds.

 

Would it be possible to use some form of jack/Acrow prop to raise the tree slightly off the wall, then secure it in place?

 

I would be very grateful for any suggestions...

 

With thanks and best wishes,

 

Patricia

 

 

 

 

Tree.jpg

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4 answers to this question

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Wrong tree in the wrong place, trunk looks in poor condition. 
fell and replace with something more suitable to be totally honest with you.

Sorry but no amount of propping can change the facts

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Fell I reckon mature sea buckthorn trees iv'e seen always tend to collapse its just its growth habit

 

Sea buckthorn strikes from cuttings fairly well so you could always try and propagate some new trees from it if you are fond of it etc.

 

The berries are a very popular food in some nordic and eastern european countries, but think you need both male and female trees..

Edited by Stere

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Nope. Yr storing up bother for the future, there. As long as you plant another tree elswhere, get it gone. K

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I don't see there being very much flexibility in that stem. Could be winched. Acrow prop would do more bark damage. A nice forgiving new permanent prop would be needed.  If trying it, do it before it comes back into leaf, it will be a good bit lighter. I wouldn't try and get it more than a few inches up. Heck I'd try it but I'd also be prepared for it not to work

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