Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
puwer

Certificate of Competence in Chainsaw and Related Operations Review Consultation

Recommended Posts

zzr sorry m8,

but your confusing your training provider( Capel ) with the assessment body (NPTC) two Hugely different beasts,

lantra is the standard setter in line with nptc guidleines the trainer / college implement them totally independantly, although the trainers need lantra certification & assessors need nptc qualifiication although both work within the same perimeters

Have a quiet chat with the tutor/ instructor.

 

 

 

I have an IPAF (International Powered Access Federation) Powered Access Licence, classes Operator and Demonstrator. Ok its not issued by NPTC/LANTRA but it is a recognised international mewp operating cert.

 

Why should I be required to take another operators course (LANTRA/NPTc) just to qualify for chainsaw in a mewp cert, if I decided to take the course.

 

I'm just trying to point out the requirement by some training bodies to use only their training courses.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

puwer im not sure on the assesment in germany, i was just trying to make a point that instead of having lots of expensive small courses you could have 3 courses teaching you pretty much the same thing, ok it might take a day or 2 longer to do the courses than have to re do multiple assments. i've spent lots of time and money getting qualified and in my opinion and that of my employees im good at my chosen proffesion, for some one to turn round and say every 3/5/ or what ever years you need to re test i think is bull ****. in the last 8 years ive worked in this industry ive learned more than any instructer has ever taught me through trial and error watching other climbers and reading information on forums like this. i think if i re took my nptc's i would probably fail on a few bad habits ive picked up but im still a much safer and better skilled climber now than i was when i passed my tickets and i dont need to spend ££££ to have some over qualified under skilled pen pusher tell me that. ( ive had bad experiences with trainers sorry to tar you all with the same brush):mad:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

JPB - i will look more into the process in germany and see what i can find out.

 

The idea of three simple units may be the way forward, as ever content is key.

 

I think we need to move away from the idea that an sort of expiry on your CoC would mean an automatic re-test, it does not have to be like that and i for one certianly would not want to see that. But is CPD for an arborist not important? For chainsaw operators CPD could include trade shows, updates, forums, seminar attendance, demos, dealer days etc. The difficulty would be determining what is acceptable and at what level.

 

We also must not loose track of what the concept of the CoC are, i would hope that any arborist knows more than when they went through their original tickets. That is what competence is all about, Knowledge, Ability, Training and Experience (KATE). But surely we all need to come off the starting blocks at some point. What we are trying to determine is what level that should be, what skills that arborist should possess when they obtain their certifcate of safety (it is not a CoC - how can it be!).

 

Regards

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

its a good idea to have CPD inclusive at shows seminars et al, the downside of these is the sheer distances to travel to get to these. Time is the essence, financial restrictions mean not all can afford to travel right across country for some seminar. Not that I'm poo-pooing the idea, its just difficult for some. I for one thoroughly enjoyed the discussion held at the end of the Guildford comp last year, this year events have restricted my travels, both financially and due to lack of time.

Last week I met a company taking out a beech tree. The climber was working on old muti-plait, with a tautline hitch. Lowering involved some archaic rope originally used to bind the Ark, and wraps around the trunk. I asked if he used anything more modern, ever. "This is what I was taught on in the 90's" and he was still using the same rope!! I bet there are many many people out there, like this man, and they will never be reached, by all the changes in the system, re-training whatever. He didnt know of any trade association, magazines, he just cuts trees....... and v. slowly at that.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

In this case, when I said slow, I really meant sssssllllllllooooooowwwww! A beech t/d that was no more than a mornings work, imo, took him 2 loooong days. It was painful to watch, honestly, and considering the length of time he's been doing the job, he should have been a bit quicker. Another chap who Steve and I both know, always climbed very old school. He's now in his 50's, and he dont hang around!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

i think that the system is long overdue for reform. i've been working in the arb industry for maybe four years and the only times that i've felled trees in forests for product has been on my training courses, so how is it that i almost failed cs33 for cutting the stump too high? in my entire career i've cut trees then cut the stumps down. just a small point, but i'm sure 70% of new chainsaw users will be much the same with most being employed in the utility sectors. i'd like to see more theoretical training, some information on why you're pruning cuts are where they should be and what effects you are having on the tree. more emphasis could be put on hazard and ill health evaluation.

i've just completed an nvq at a college, it's basically an apprentiship, for a complete new starter, it takes up to 18 months, you build a portfolio of work that you do, it includes photographs, witness testimonies, proof of training, testimony from mentors etc. this , i feel, is a far more valuable way to learn rather than merely going on three, week long courses.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Shabz,

 

NVQs/apprentic i thought might be a suggestion. The HSE consultation on certification in tree work attracetd a comment from a very respected trainer assssor commenting on how the apprec/NVQ route suited the training needs of our industry very well.

 

IMO NVQs or at least work based learning may well be the way forward - maybe a rename and rebrand is what is needed, NVQs, well at least the title seem to have a real stigma to them.

 

A reduction in number of units?

Turn the emphasis away from forestry?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Surely Arb is a big enough industry to maybe stand on its own, with its own set of tickets, including the felling side, and maybe incorporating crane usage too. The Forestry sector already has its tickets in place. As has been commented on already, felling high in arb is quite common, in forestry/woodland lower the better, for best value out of timber! Importance of clean snedding out in forestry is something that in arb seems to be over-looked, is this thru idleness or because it "doesnt matter" any more?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Surely Arb is a big enough industry to maybe stand on its own, with its own set of tickets, including the felling side, and maybe incorporating crane usage too. The Forestry sector already has its tickets in place. As has been commented on already, felling high in arb is quite common, in forestry/woodland lower the better, for best value out of timber! Importance of clean snedding out in forestry is something that in arb seems to be over-looked, is this thru idleness or because it "doesnt matter" any more?

 

Arb and forestry used to have their own tickets..CS10,11 etc for forestry, and CS 20, 21 and 22 covered all arb.

 

Another thing that's overlooked in arb..sharpening saws..:D

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this  

  • Featured Adverts

About

Arbtalk.co.uk is a hub for the arboriculture industry in the UK.  
If you're just starting out and you need business, equipment, tech or training support you're in the right place.  If you've done it, made it, got a van load of oily t-shirts and have decided to give something back by sharing your knowledge or wisdom,  then you're welcome too.
If you would like to contribute to making this industry more effective and safe then welcome.
Just like a living tree, it'll always be a work in progress.
Please have a look around, sign up, share and contribute the best you have.

See you inside.

The Arbtalk Team

Follow us

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.