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Best time of year to coppice / pollard?

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Thanks one and all. Winter is probably still the best bet overall.

 

Maybe I'll do it as and when I have time, and see how it goes!

 

 

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On 10/07/2019 at 21:09, Rough Hewn said:


The differences between winter and summer cut wood are many.
For firewood it's less weight to move and less water to extract.
For milling as above and the boards are more stable.
Bark will strip easier from summer cut than winter cut for most species.
Recently discovered large mature beech trees will split more readily when summer cut, as well as being incredibly heavy.
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bit of old wives tale in some of that .....see link ....

WEB.UTK.EDU

The Forest Products Extension Program at the University of Tennessee exists to assist the wood products industry and...

 

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bit of old wives tale in some of that .....see link ....
WEB.UTK.EDU
The Forest Products Extension Program at the University of Tennessee exists to assist the wood products industry and...  

Nope.
This is from personal experience.
Im talking about British hardwood,
Not Tennessee softwoods.
No old wives involved.
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Apparently for hazel it doesn't make much diffference to growth rates after a few yrs what time you coppice it.

 

Read some really good study they did an experiment coppicing in every month, stools did just as well after 5yrs etc (height and thickness/number of rods) if coppiced in summer as the winter coppiced ones.

 

Annoying can't find the study  now.

 

Also read somewhere else charcoal  makers and bodgers coppiced all year round.

 

 

Wonder about frost hardyness though for tender shoots if late  summer coppiced (espeically chesnut maybe?)

 

About moisture content if you leave the leaves on tree  for a while after summer felling the wood is suppose to loose some of ther the moisture....transpiration.

 

Think  it was in nowegian wood they mentioned it

 

 

 

 

 

Edited by Stere
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Thanks stere, interesting to hear about no change in growth rates. Whenever I have time and inclination then!

 

I'd better plant some more, can never have too many trees...

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