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openspaceman

Kevin, Dazz and Driver

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Would any of our ex services readers like to comment on the petition to save these ex services (2 army one police) dogs being euthanased because they are unsuitable for adoption post retirement?

 

I can understand them not being suitable as domestic pets and having a cost to keep but it seems an unfair end after faithful service.

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I haven’t seen the story but can imagine the scenario. The Vet Officer for working dogs was my oppo while I was Deputy Chief of Staff at Camp Bastion. Time in the kennels was a valuable escape from daily business.  

 

Id have them all come and stay with me if it was allowed.  

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I was a dog handler in my Regiment and have mixed feelings about this. When I had to leave my guard dog in Ireland for the next regiment , I cried like a girl. I'd had him straight from training,  he was a big part of me for 2 and a half years. But, the other side of the coin is that a lot of these dogs are unstable , some of the handlers were quite brutal, the dogs were treated harshly by some blokes and it rubs off on them. The dogs were taken for training as long as they looked like an Alsatian and would show aggression, this was a long time ago, standards hopefully have changed for the better. Some of the dogs we had would have you as soon as look at you. As to the present situation, would you chance an animal living with your family that you know could turn on them? Don't forget that plenty of squaddies have turned on their loved ones because of their experiences, what chance has a dog got to alter his mind set?

Whilst I love dogs and think that it's a heart breaking situation for these dogs, I would not even contemplate rehoming them with a family. For the sniffer dogs , they are a different kettle of fish. They could be used again,  I'm sure. 

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Difficult situation here,i knew some dog handlers in the forces and i know how strong a bond there is infact im pretty sure one of the guys was able to buy the dog when his "time"came.

These dogs surley could be looked after by someone who was ex forces or police handler,puttin em down should be a last option after all others are exhausted.

Working dogs are trained differently now than they used to be so its not an aggression issue imo,just a lack of understanding by dog adoption agencies who dont want to risk any comeback on a dog that is perceived to be aggressive when the reality is they probably arent.

Edited by stihlmadasever

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2 hours ago, David Cropper said:

Whilst I love dogs and think that it's a heart breaking situation for these dogs, I would not even contemplate rehoming them with a family. For the sniffer dogs , they are a different kettle of fish. They could be used again,  I'm sure. 

Yes I had it on board from the outset that there was almost certainly a good reason they couldn't be rehomed to a domestic situation and to keep them in an institution would cost money but it's more to do with the compact between man and other animal. I see WRAC patrolling the local barracks with dogs in between the perimeter fences and I don't want a dog like that to accompany me on my walks.

 

If service dogs can be awarded medals for heroism then lesser dogs should be able to live out their days, even though I know many dogs end up being killed before their time.

 

In the case in point I believe they were used to locate IEDs rather than being attack dogs.

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I wouldn’t suggest some dogs, depending upon their previous role / training / learnt behaviour, would be suitable for integration into a “family pet” indoor family dog scenario. That clearly wouldn’t be appropriate or sensible. But that’s not to say protection, tracking, obedience trained dogs have no role outside of the military; just that caution should be applied in considering the where, why and who with. In the wrong scenario, they should be considered as a potentially lethal weapon. Our previous GSD was sent to Germany for 8 months intensive Shutzhund training and came back into the family dog role. Never ceases to amaze me what they will do for you if asked properly. First attempt, he was either going to bite me or shred the head gear, 2 mins later, I’m not allowed to take it off him (or so he thinks!)

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It will be an informed decision, most dogs get rehomed easily. However, some dogs aren't suitable and have major issues - in the same way some blokes have major issues. An unpredictable malinois is not something you want around!

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8 hours ago, kevinjohnsonmbe said:

. First attempt, he was either going to bite me or shred the head gear, 2 mins later, I’m not allowed to take it off him 

I'd probably bite you if you tried to put that on me too!:D

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14 hours ago, openspaceman said:

 

In the case in point I believe they were used to locate IEDs rather than being attack dogs.

I'll retract that, today the BBC reported they had been reprieved but they were attack dogs..

 

I feel the few that replied have missed my point that even if they are too aggressive to be re-homed then another option should be found for their few remaining years.

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I spent 2 years fostering rescued dogs.
Had all kinds of dogs, hunt dogs, abandoned, abused and fighting dogs.
99% can be re-homed after 3-6 months of training.
Even had a fighting pitbull we gave to a girl in a wheelchair.
We had a mate who would keep the dangerous ones.
You wouldn't want to break into his house.

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