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Quickthorn

346XP Clutch Removal

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The way I've always done this is to take out the spark plug, put in a plastic piston stop to stop the crank rotating, then undo the clutch by putting a suitable punch into the notch provided on the clutch and giving the punch a whack with a hammer. Now, I've just asked my local Husky dealer if there's a special tool or something for this - he says use a punch, but he also says "never use a piston stop" ! Does anyone agree with this? Surely, the thing will just turn over when you whack it and you'll get nowhere. He seems to think that a sharp enough tap will get the clutch off...:confused1:

 

If he's right, what are you supposed to do with something like a 254 xp? That has a hex head you can get a socket on, but no notches.

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Husky D   

Yes mate it will work! The engine compression will stop the clutch spinning (make sure the decompression button is out:biggrin:) and use your combi spanner and hammer and it will shock off. I know some people use battery impact drivers but the basics work fine. Don't expect it to fall off with one light tap if it hasn't been off for a while and getting the angle of the spanner in the notch right helps to drive through the clutch rather than into the clutch if that makes sense. Definately don't try this with a piston stop in otherwise the potential for damage to the piston or the breaking/shearing of the stop in the cylinder is high. On the 254 it doesn't have the notch's for this and i wouldn't recommend to hit the clutch for fear of smashing it but thats just my opinion! I do use a stop/knotted starter cord in emergencies even on my 254 but put a spanner or socket (I think its 14 or 15mm?) on the head of the clutch and turn it until it comes tight against the stop (clockwise) and then apply slow pressure and they will give. I have got a insert to put over the centre of the clutch on 353's so you can put a spanner on them if you wanted to use a stop with it but shock them usually to be honest.

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Thanks for the help.

 

If you take the starter cover off, there's a nut in the middle of the flywheel..can that be used to hold it all still without breaking anything?

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Thanks for the help.

 

If you take the starter cover off, there's a nut in the middle of the flywheel..can that be used to hold it all still without breaking anything?

 

Not sure - probably. but i always take the starter cover off if im removing a clutch

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Husky D   
Thanks for the help.

 

If you take the starter cover off, there's a nut in the middle of the flywheel..can that be used to hold it all still without breaking anything?

 

Don't see the point to be honest quickthorn. Although shocking the clutch off with hammer and combi looks harsh nothing is being physically held or moved where it shouldn't be. Holding on to the flywheel means removing the recoil starter cover and then trying to hold and undo things needing 3 hands and being unnecessary imo mate. Give the shock method ago apart from having to turn the clutch to find the compression and sometimes having to refind it if the clutch moves i bet you find it easy enough. Go on mate be brave:thumbup:

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I've always used starter cord.

 

Its a good idead to take the starter recoil off when you change the clutch or put a new rim on and then theres no danger of snapping the starter cord if you forget to pull a bit out. :001_smile:

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Don't see the point to be honest quickthorn. Although shocking the clutch off with hammer and combi looks harsh nothing is being physically held or moved where it shouldn't be. Holding on to the flywheel means removing the recoil starter cover and then trying to hold and undo things needing 3 hands and being unnecessary imo mate. Give the shock method ago apart from having to turn the clutch to find the compression and sometimes having to refind it if the clutch moves i bet you find it easy enough. Go on mate be brave:thumbup:

 

Cheers, :thumbup1: I'll try it in a while. No point now, as I've just put it back together, and it'll come off easily.

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piston stops are a bad idea...

 

ive seen pics of a saw piston with a hole punched in the crown by a plastic piston stop!

 

rope isnt a great idea...

 

ive heard of transfer damage by shoving rope too far into the plug-hole, and seen a bent con-rod from a saw piston stopped by rope while a flywheel was removed!

 

(not mentioned here, but...) impact drivers, terrible idea...

 

countless horror stories of sheared cranks!

 

 

 

clutch removal... depending on the style, scrench and hammer tap, or socket and breaking bar, no piston stop... compression is your friend:thumbup1:

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Mesterh   

(not mentioned here, but...) impact drivers, terrible idea...

 

countless horror stories of sheared cranks!

 

Works fine for me!

 

Cant really see how it would snap a crank tbh, could always remove the plug so no compression would still prob spin it off.

 

In fact I will try that tomorrow. :001_smile:

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