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tree_beard

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About tree_beard

  • Rank
    Senior Member, Raffle sponsor 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

Personal Information

  • Location:
    kernow
  • Occupation
    harbour-wrist

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1,110 profile views
  1. Good to hear you're on top of these things... Breaking big rigging is a life lesson that stays with you. As far as the HSE are concerned, Equipment used in forestry does not need to be thoroughly examined where: it does not lift loads over people and the operators of equipment are protected by: a roll-over protective structure (ROPS) or a tip-over protective structure (TOPS) combined with: a falling object protective structure (FOPS) and an operator protective structure (OPS) So broadly speaking you're good to go if the crane controls are in your cab. Lifting equipment in forestry - Treework - HSE WWW.HSE.GOV.UK The Lifting Operations and Lifting Equipment... Here's the (horses mouth) ins and outs of it.
  2. Loler is not applicable to most forestry winches, or to forestry forwarding cranes.
  3. I think Land cruiser do a commercial version for the UK market again
  4. Pittosporum undulatum mebbe... One of the taller paler leaved ones I reckon. I'm no expert, but I've felled (and topped the snot out of) several 40ft Pittosporum over the years, and the sap of at least one variety burns my skin... Shame I can't remember which one
  5. I'm no good with fish or cocks, but that there looks like a mature Pittosporum to me
  6. Granberg mini mill https://www.chainsawbars.co.uk/product/g555b-granberg-vertical-mini-mill/
  7. Sounds like your relay has failed. I'm not familiar with where it is on the 190 but it should be one of these https://shop.spectrum-plant.com/index.php/default/relay-safety-circuit-and-hydraulic-control-circuits.html (Also available from all good motor factors)
  8. I think lots of the cheap oak landscaping sleepers are turkey oak, thus piss poor rot resistance. That and 'real' sleepers have had such a good creosote bath they sweat cancer every time the sun comes out.
  9. A small oval maillon and your double action snap hook can continue service on a shiny new wire core strop. I much prefer the old doubles to the shiny new triple action snaps.
  10. Have you been up the tree for a close look at the browning limbs? No partial failure involved? I wouldnt say its a mature radiata, but is on the cusp of maturity... its of the age where I would expect it to start shading out its own lower/inner limbs and occasionally shitting out a tree sized limb from the upper crown... forming the classic wide spread tip heavy crown of a mature monterey
  11. 2153 was the 50cc 346xp silver side equivalent
  12. I suspect your perspective depends on your clients and usual job type. A purely freelance climber may well find it beneficial to have a variable price structure depending on job type or equipment needs. Maybe pruning for a well equipped tree company one day and removal for a landscaping firm the next. I only work for (with)a handfull of firms, usually sole trader all round tree workers, who have their own rigging kit/big saws anyway. We're rarely lacking in gear to get the job done, and generally the more the merrier. That and it's usually removals for me... If you can... bring loads of shiny cool gear and charge the earth for it
  13. It would be more like a mechanic charging extra for using spanners. Its a fairly basic requirement for aerial tree work. If a specific tree requires something really exceptional (elaborate speedline for example) maybe add on the cost of an extra hank of rope or couple of pulleys. But those kind of trees tend to be multi thousand pound jobs that have the margins to pay for extra gear anyway.
  14. Rigging is such an elemental aspect of tree work why would you separate it from your usual rate?

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