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wyk

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About wyk

  • Rank
    Senior Member

Personal Information

  • Location:
    Wicklow and Waterford Demesne, Ireland
  • Occupation
    Timber Cruiser, Sawman
  • City
    Enniskerry

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  1. wyk

    What saws you got ?

    OK, I injured myself last week, so sort of didn't get around to sawing and photo-ing. But here's a few shots of what I brought back that need to be repaired. 044 is gonna just get a cleaning and timing advance. 241 needs a new carb, handle, and I am gonna gut the stratos on her to see if it makes a big difference - gonna swap it out for my Echo CS390 for the farm in the mean time. 281, which is now a 288xp, is getting new wiring.
  2. wyk

    New barrel and piston for Husky 365

    OK, so no one reads owners manuals. I know...I'm old and have nothing better to do when I am popping Ibuprofen during my extended lunch breaks. But hear me out: Open up your Husqvarna owner's manuals and flip to the page about mix. It states there clearly to use a mix of 50:1. If it is not Husky brand oil, you are to use 33:1(this includes other full synths) or even _25:1_. Why would a company state in their own literature(owner's manual, no less) you should use more oil in the mix if it is different from one they've tested and approved other than the fact that maybe they are pushing the limits of lubrication at 50:1? Yes, they do want to sell their own oil, but that likely doesn't mean they also want you to destroy your saw if you don't. And they are stating this right in their own literature. They aren't suggestion 25:1 because it will lean out the saw and destroy it. The manufacture themselves are suggesting it to prevent premature wear and promote proper lubrication because there are so, so, so many choices in oil out there, and so very little knowledge about their usage. Go to page 25 of the 365,372 operator's manual for the reference: http://www.husqvarna.com/ddoc/HUSO/HUSO2004_EUenAPen/HUSO2004_EUenAPen__1140206-26.pdf If HUSQVARNA two-stroke oil is not available, you may use another two-stroke oil of good quality that is intended for air cooled engines. Contact your dealer when selecting an oil. Mixing ratio 1:33 (3%)-1:25 (4%)
  3. wyk

    What saws you got ?

    Guess I'll throw in here: MS241 ported by WYK Echo 361WES cat deleted Echo 390ESX cat deleted Stihl 044 10mm(I use this for most work) , 391, 250, 181, 170 Husqvarna 288xp mildly massaged by myself Most with Sugi or Tsumura light bars I might take a family pic tomorrow while I'm in Waterford.
  4. wyk

    Battery saw

    If not battery, what corded saws would you folks suggest? I was looking at the battery ones, and what they ask for the saw at the start and then the batteries afterwards, has turned me off of them rather quickly. I want to get in to doing more carving up in Wicklow in my back garden instead of having to go all the way back to the estate in Waterford I'm a forester of. Mebbe @shavey has the Makita versions in stock?
  5. wyk

    Need advice, want to upgrade my saw.

    Sorry, meant to say XT version - x torq. I'll see if I can edit it.
  6. wyk

    Need advice, want to upgrade my saw.

    It's a good little saw for small jobs. Ours is replaced with an Echo 360WES, which is significantly lighter and more powerful. The issue we had with our 181 was it just isn't very robust for firewood use. I'm curious to see how our 360 gets on after a few years. The 181 lasted 2 years.
  7. wyk

    Need advice, want to upgrade my saw.

    In practice the Makita 7900 is significantly more powerful than even the 372, let alone the 365. It also costs quite a bit less from @shavey Keep in mind the XT version is a bit more weight than this non XT Husky:
  8. wyk

    What saws you got ?

    You still over in Enniskerry? I'm parked across the way in Bray for a bit now.
  9. wyk

    New barrel and piston for Husky 365

    Husqvarna suggest using 32:1 in their manuals as well as 50:1. I can not find a suggested ratio for milling as milling is not even mentioned in the owners manuals I have here. Modern chainsaws are not designed for milling. Mills are designed for milling. Chainsaws are designed mainly to idle, and then occasionally make a few cuts at WOT, idle some more, repeat(and, if you like to run Sabre at 100:1 - seize up somewhere in there). Chainsaw milling is WOT for very long cuts. Let's do some sitting and thinking here... which operation will produce more heat? CSM, of course. Anyone experienced at milling will either run more oil in the mix, or tune their saws to run richer(lower top RPM, which means more oil in the mix reaches the engine per rpm), or both. 40:1 full synth and 11.5-12K rpm on an MS660 or 288xp/3120xp is very typical. That is much more oil than MTronic is going to suck in to the saw at 50:1 with a WOT closer to 13.6K RPM. On top of that, MT and AT are going to be running at 14.7 or so to 1 VS maybe 13.6:1 - a far leaner AF ratio, which means higher temps for milling. What you are trying to do with milling is not only lubricate the engine, but also keep it cool as possible. With an mtronic or AT machine, you don't get to tell it what rpm to top out at(yet). You have to run more oil if you want to introduce more oil in to the chassis. How much more? Fucked if I know - I don't dare mill with an electronic carb saw...I even see folks that do chainsaw carving set their saws up very rich since they often are at partial throttle. Yes, you will foul plugs occasionally, especially when you are on the front of the curve. But a 5 pack of NGK BPMR7A's is a tenner. A 3120XP isn't. The idea of lean seems to originate from folks that do not understand the fact that oil BURNS in a chainsaw, or maybe have never used a chainsaw before uh.. 1997 when 30 and 32:1 were common. Maybe someone in the modern courses is talking shit? I dunno. What you need to come away with is the fact that oil doesn't always shear out of the mix in to the chassis. Thus, a good part of the oil makes it to the combustion chamber. When you tune a saw, you are tuning for fuel air mixture. Much of that oil in the mix is in that fuel that reaches the combustion chamber. If the saw is lean, it's due to the tune, not to the mix.
  10. wyk

    Sugi hara bar

    https://www.chainsawbars.co.uk/product-category/sugihara-light-type-bars/ or use the bar selector: https://www.chainsawbars.co.uk/
  11. wyk

    New barrel and piston for Husky 365

    Yes. He's wrong. As are all folks who use the 'lean' idiology. It ignores the most basic part about chainsaw tuning. It is the air to fuel mixture that allows the chainsaw to idle correctly, climb in rpm and to four stroke at peak rpm(when tuned right) - not the oil to fuel mixture. Oil has little to do with chainsaw tuning. If your saw is tuned right, you can run nearly any ratio. That is how saws ran at 16:1 for decades before, and at 25:1 and 32:1. 50:1 is the leanest ratio manufacturers have found that will work in modern saws using fully synthetic oils. The leanest ratio they dare to use, not the optimum ratio they use. This was done to pass EPA mandated emissions. Why? Because oil burns in the mix, and introduces loads of hydrocarbons to the exhaust. In other words, oil does not lean out the mix - it is part of the mix that burns. Leaning the mix out is a myth. If it wasn't, then manufacturers would be suggesting 80:1 100:1, etc. Which, of course, they don't. When I was young, like back in the 70's/80's, no one I knew had a lean seizure(and I worked in wild land fire fighting with chainsaws in the 80's using non synthetic oils). Nowadays - common. Here is a copy of my statement from the Echo 352 thread: At a mix ratio of 32:1 vs 50:1, you have a difference of 1.125% more oil in the fuel mix - 3.125% VS 2%. 1.125% less petrol is not going to cause your engine to over heat or seize. However, the over all amount of oil that enters the engine at 32:1 is over half again more vs 50:1. So, at 32:1 VS 50:1 you risk an air/fuel ratio compromise of about 1% in order to get at least another 50% more lubrication in to the engine(but you really don't, as some of the oil makes it to combustion) - which is about 14.52:1 air to fuel VS what is the agreed upon 14.7:1 as the optimum fuel/air ratio for most petrol motors - assuming you do not tune your engine for your mix, and you then go from 50:1 to 32:1. Autotune and mtronic (and you, if you know what you're doing) will tune this out as you tune for RPM or 'four stroking' and idle, which is a result of the air to fuel mixture, not the oil to fuel mixture. But, as is obvious, even if you do not touch your carb controls, chances are your mixture will be more affected by a change in weather than a change in your mix unless, as Steve has stated, you start to go down to crazy ratios. At the end of the day it is called mix for a reason. The oil is now part of the fuel, not a separate entity as it is metered in to the saw. Not all of the oil will shear from the fuel as it goes through the engine - only part of it does - otherwise your saw would pour oil from every orifice after a few days of hard use. Much of it is burned, which is obvious if you look at the emissions tables on 2 strokes VS about anything else aside from diesels - the carbon emissions go up drastically when you go from 50:1 to 32:1 - which make sense. If the fuel to air ratio leaned out dangerous from 50:1 to 32:1, you would have to see far, far less carbon emissions vs more. If you want to avoid seizing, carbon build up, etc etc - simply use a good high-quality fully synthetic oil designed for air-cooled non-marine application two strokes at a decent ratio, and make sure your engine is tuned properly.
  12. wyk

    New barrel and piston for Husky 365

    Few people mill using less than 25:1 or 32:1. I think a guy I knew in oregon uses 16:1. Milling is the toughest thing on a chainsaw you can do short of giving your saw to me back when I was 19.
  13. wyk

    572 users - experience

    But with a 39mm stroke on the 572, I wonder if a 52 or 54mm top end is possible.
  14. At a mix ratio of 32:1 vs 50:1, you have a difference of 1.125% more oil in the fuel mix - 3.125% VS 2%. 1.125% less petrol is not going to cause your engine to over heat or seize. However, the over all amount of oil that enters the engine at 32:1 is over half again more vs 50:1. So, at 32:1 VS 50:1 you risk an air/fuel ratio compromise of about 1% in order to get at least another 50% more lubrication in to the engine(but you really don't, as some of the oil makes it to combustion) - which is about 14.52:1 air to fuel VS what is the agreed upon 14.7:1 as the optimum fuel/air ratio for most petrol motors - assuming you do not tune your engine for your mix, and you go from 50:1 to 32:1. Autotune and mtronic (and you, if you know what you're doing) will tune this out as you tune for RPM or 'four stroking' and idle, which is a result of the air to fuel mixture, not the oil to fuel mixture. But, as is obvious, even if you do not touch your carb controls, chances are your mixture will be more affected by a change in weather than a change in your mix unless, as Steve has stated, you start to go down to crazy ratios. At the end of the day it is called mix for a reason. The oil is now part of the fuel, not a separate entity as it is metered in to the saw. Not all of the oil will shear from the fuel as it goes through the engine - only part of it does - otherwise your saw would pour oil from every orifice after a few days of hard use. Much of it is burned(which is obvious if you look at the emissions tables on 2 strokes VS about anything else aside from diesels). If you want to avoid seizing, carbon build up, etc etc - simply use a good high-quality fully synthetic oil designed for air-cooled non-marine application two strokes at a decent ratio, and make sure your engine is tuned properly.
  15. wyk

    Husquarvana 560xp problems cutting out

    Dave did a test on the 550 and a bit with the 572 in another video. The new 572 comes with more vents cut in to the top cover than the 560 used to. The newer top covers on all their saws appear to all have more vents to help reduce the issues from over heating. Also of note, after looking at the most recent photos there, it appears there really should be a partition between the two areas there, the intake and the cylinder. The new 572 has one, I dunno how the 560 and 550 go about this, or whether he is simply missing it or if it was never there to begin?

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