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Len Brennan

Mystery Yew fungus

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Is that the best you can do Sloth, his original quote was " suspect its anamorph"!

 

I'm not trying to 'best' anything.

 

To add any credibility to what you have written he would have had to say, I suspect that P. schwenitzii has two stages of fruiting and this is the anamorph!

 

True. I may be completely wrong having read between the lines of someone who struggles to get their point accross concisely using the written word. (No offence Tony)

 

Every reader and his dog knows the truth here Sloth!

 

Imagine if someone else wrote that s***, he would have been down their throats like a fat old Matron, I have seen this so many times and it makes me want to vomit and it will not stop until the unnecessary pampering stops.

 

I think it would depend who wrote it and in what context. From what I have seen of Tonys postings over the last few years he would be more likely to ask for further clarification of the intended meaning. Again, I may be wrong.

I don't want to spark some sort of post war with you, you seem pretty knowledgeable and often make good points :thumbup: however it seems to me you have taken a personal and unnecessary issue with Tony. I don't want you to think I'm pampering him, he is big enough to look after himself. True, some people afford him a 'fungi demi god' like status. I dont believe he feels that is warranted and makes no bones about his lack of education or qualifications. Sometimes he can be a drama queen, and needs to step off his high horse; and sometimes he's right to be on it.

As said before, nobody is perfect. Perhaps Tony will come along and say my assumptions on his post are wrong. In which case I apologise. If the replies to his posts sicken you, a good start might be the 'ignore memer posts function'!

All the best,

Kevin

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That has cleared nothing up, you have tried to baffle brains with meaningless gobledygook and again state the obvious.

 

My question was, "does Phaeolus Schweinitzii have an anamorph" ?!

 

The answer is very simple, requiring a maximum of ONLY three letters

 

 

Jonny, I'm just trying to add my opinion/interest/thoughts/possibilities/potential avenues of exploration into the mix, and the answer is not three letters, it could be a two letter answer but mine is possible, but not known as far as i can tell.

 

Before you start baiting, why dont you have a stab, a wild guess, its o.k, nobody will think your a moron or anything, we just have fun talking about these things.

 

I would be more interested in YOUR opinions on the fungi than on your interest in my views.

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Good close ups, even if Phaeolus did have an anamorph it I suspect might be more tightly grouped than this.

 

It looks in the close up to be very similar to what Felugio septica or F candida goes to after maturation, was it puffy and fragile?

 

Ive never seen it on Yew before and it normaly likes well rotted soft substrates and the wood here looks hard and dessicated with missing bark?

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From what I have seen of his unusual ammount of posts he is an uneducated bully

 

Yes, and I have duly acknowledged this error, apologized to the mods for past crimes, and will now take the opportunity to apologize to anyone, especially treeseer who has felt my overbearing presence in the past.

 

 

I am now, ( people can change and learn from their mistakes) doing my VERY utmost to ensure there is no hint of such intent in my postings, and I thank you Jonny, for if you hadnt been quite so... lets say floral in your personal views of me I may not have realized what it must be like to read what I say without seeing my face or being able to read the body languages.

 

I was mortified when you told me what you thought of me and described the utter cesspit of my years of discussions here. I cant do anything about that now, but I can make sure that the future is filled with a much improved Hamadryad.

 

with regard to my "fungal demi god status" I have always found this rather amusing, I am just a very passionate and enthusiastic amateur, with a very well respected ability and instinct for fungi. I merely try to use that to promote fungal interest and education, inspire others to tap into this largely overlooked and fascinating subject. Many people on this forum and outside of the forum have enjoyed many days of adventure learning and discovery, and THAT is all I am here for.

 

I am sincerely sorry that you feel sickened and especially that you fel I have bullied or mis informed others this I take VERY seriously and feel a shame the likes I havent felt for a long time, it will be rectified and then some I can assure you.

 

if you took the time to get to know me, rather than judge the cyber presence i would like to think you would find me a very different animal, who would give you his last sandwich, or break his back trying to help others with a problem.

 

Every situation and event in life has its reasons, even the bad things, i think you was my wake up call, and I needed it, so alls good.:thumbup1:

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Looks a little like the Fenugreek stalkball - Phleogena faginea

 

But I'm not sure, and I don't recall having seen it in such proliferation or on coniferous wood.

 

 

Phleogena faginea - Fenugreek Stalkball - Photo 980

 

 

 

.

 

good shout, one of these myxo groups seems most likely in those close ups, seemed much blacker and crusty in the first images:thumbup1:

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Good close ups, even if Phaeolus did have an anamorph it I suspect might be more tightly grouped than this.

 

It looks in the close up to be very similar to what Felugio septica or F candida goes to after maturation, was it puffy and fragile?

 

Ive never seen it on Yew before and it normaly likes well rotted soft substrates and the wood here looks hard and dessicated with missing bark?

 

It's on a live, if slightly sickly looking, yew and quite dense and spongy, not at all fragile or puffy.

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