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Marcus B-T

National Meripilus Network

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We have been given funding to set up a 'national meripilus network' to gather information on the occurances of the fungus, the ways in which it causes decay in trees and its occurance in tree failures. The purpose of the network is to gather scientific information on if, how and why it is a serious consideration in tree failures, or not as the case may be. There are oportunities to be invloved in the network at all levels and information will be freely available on a new web site that should be up and running by December. We will be launching the network at the Thermal Imaging afternoon on Thursday 6th Nov at Wimpole Hall and at the Decay Research Update day on 20th Nov, again at Wimpole Hall. Further information from

 

marcus@trees-project.co.uk

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We have been given funding to set up a 'national meripilus network' to gather information on the occurances of the fungus, [/email]

 

Marcus, I can not make Wimpole, but I'm your man, sign me up.

I have great access to not only my own site at Hampstead Heath, but also great contacts at Burnham and Epping.

I would be very keen to be involved.

 

Got loads of photos and locations.

 

Have many Fagus, Quercus & Acer with Giant Polypore on, particularly this year.

No failures as recently though.

 

All the best

 

david.humphries@cityoflondon.gov.uk

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We have a Beech stump with meripilus to grind out. It came down on tuesday. If you want any data just tell me what you want. I would be interested to excavate some roots any way.

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The presence of Meripilus at the base of a beech tree is not a reason to fell it !!!!!!!!!!!!!!

 

My investigations of tree root systems and particularly those of beech have illustrated how little we know about them and more to the point the information available in books is totally misleading.

 

Meripilus is actually an essential part of beech tree ecology and integral to its survival strategy.

 

Yes it can become an issue when it gets into the lateral root system, but this is usually as a result of other root damage or soil compaction that has injured or killed roots that have then become available to be decayed by Meripilus.

 

Where Meripilus is found at the base of a beech tree the decision to fell or even reduce the tree should not be made without undertaking a root investigation to determine where the fungus is living.

 

In mature trees the structural bias of growth within the buttresses means that there is no longer a functional path for carbohydrates to feed and support the lower layers of the root system and the remnants of the trees ‘tap’ root. During its establishing years the tree maintains the lower root system, but in maturity a greater emphasis appears to be placed on the surface roots that then spread out to form a flair at the base of the trunk similar to that found on traffic cones.

 

When the lower root system is no longer supported by the tree and is starved of carbohydrates it begins to dry out and progressively decayed by fungi such as Meripilus. As the wood is decayed nutrients are released back into the soil, where a fibrous root mass is growing from the surface. The tree is now able to effectively recycle itself, but only because the fungi are there to assist it in the process.

 

The growth of the tree’s root system is totally different from the crown above ground level and its structural form bares no relationship, with a far greater proportion of young roots being produced on a cyclic basis. We have found significant concentrations of fibrous root growth at the base of trees and under the buttresses, particularly in association with decay fungi.

 

The idea that a trees root system continually grows bigger and bigger out away from the trunk in a similar way to the crown in the air above, is a totally misconception and nothing like what actually occurs.

 

Trees could not survive as long as they do without their close co-evolutionary relationship with decay fungi that are an integral part of their ecology.

ConeTree.pdf

Root Investigation CaseStudy C.pdf

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These are all fair points ...the mechanical requirements for tree stability have been statistically analysed on the other hand and the proportional relationship between DBH and buttress root integrity can be assessed ( without too much drama in most cases I would estimate ) allowing us to make decisions about the risk any tree represents in its situation. ( in relation to the immediate environment whu )

What this doesnt tell us tho' is perhaps of more interest , or more significance maybe...if you take my meaning. This is surely the value of such a scheme ( and it has to be said, investigations that inform the extent and nature of root decay strategies in arboriculture ) such as the demise that the tree dismantled, offers up ?

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I am of the pursuasion that there is a small but growing trend afoot, to hold off from immediately felling Beech with Meripilus.

 

 

The key in my opinion as you quite rightly suggest Andrew, is monitoring and investigation.

Appreciate your data posting.

 

The main problem here is that "Return Management" is aspirational but currently largely unrealistic.

 

Of course big land owners, some LA's and possibly a handfull of forward thinking home/tree owners may have and give opportunity to future management of Trees with conditions such as Merip.

But It's interaction like this here on the forum where Arbs with the passion and desire of really getting to know about the relationships between a Tree and it's localised environment, is where progression lies.

Not to mention sustainability for Arbs to make returning profit rather than one hit felling/topping.

 

We also require balance to the debate from those with the appropriate legal experience to possibly curb over enthusiasm from a situation where an Arb might make the wrong call with out having all the facts.

 

 

This industry needs to start thinking holistically with regards to Tree management, and redress the phylosophy to just Fire Fight.

Too many of our Great Trees that give this country it's natural heritage are prematurely felled.

 

Keep seeing Trees on here and elsewhere, that have evidence of basal decay, quite often very early stage that more than likely do not need felling.

 

 

:ciao:

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Keep seeing Trees on here and elsewhere, that have evidence of basal decay, quite often very early stage that more than likely do not need felling.

 

:ciao:

 

It would seem so....! :sad:

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The presence of Meripilus at the base of a beech tree is not a reason to fell it !!!!!!!!!!!!!!

 

My investigations of tree root systems and particularly those of beech have illustrated how little we know about them and more to the point the information available in books is totally misleading.

 

Meripilus is actually an essential part of beech tree ecology and integral to its survival strategy.

 

Yes it can become an issue when it gets into the lateral root system, but this is usually as a result of other root damage or soil compaction that has injured or killed roots that have then become available to be decayed by Meripilus.

 

Where Meripilus is found at the base of a beech tree the decision to fell or even reduce the tree should not be made without undertaking a root investigation to determine where the fungus is living.

 

In mature trees the structural bias of growth within the buttresses means that there is no longer a functional path for carbohydrates to feed and support the lower layers of the root system and the remnants of the trees ‘tap’ root. During its establishing years the tree maintains the lower root system, but in maturity a greater emphasis appears to be placed on the surface roots that then spread out to form a flair at the base of the trunk similar to that found on traffic cones.

 

When the lower root system is no longer supported by the tree and is starved of carbohydrates it begins to dry out and progressively decayed by fungi such as Meripilus. As the wood is decayed nutrients are released back into the soil, where a fibrous root mass is growing from the surface. The tree is now able to effectively recycle itself, but only because the fungi are there to assist it in the process.

 

The growth of the tree’s root system is totally different from the crown above ground level and its structural form bares no relationship, with a far greater proportion of young roots being produced on a cyclic basis. We have found significant concentrations of fibrous root growth at the base of trees and under the buttresses, particularly in association with decay fungi.

 

The idea that a trees root system continually grows bigger and bigger out away from the trunk in a similar way to the crown in the air above, is a totally misconception and nothing like what actually occurs.

 

Trees could not survive as long as they do without their close co-evolutionary relationship with decay fungi that are an integral part of their ecology.

 

Interesting ideas, the first link to the pdf wont open.

 

This is the msg that appears-

 

http://arbtalk.co.uk/forum/attachment.php?attachmentid=7545&d=1224109398

 

Steve?

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