Jump to content
scotspine1

Phytophthora lateralis found at Loch Lomond

Recommended Posts

I've recently just dealt with a 3rd site near Loch Lomond where I suspected P. lateralis was the culprit, the Lawsons were either killed outright stone dead or infected by the pathogen, it seems to be spreading fast. Forestry Commission visited the site twice and took samples, definitely P. lateralis.

 

If it does take hold in a big way it will see the loss of probably to most important garden conifer in the UK.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I did a job on a clients place in south london and it had it. It's not a big conifer. At closer look it as seem to have happened strait after some cowboys had topped it

 

 

Choose a job you love, and you will never have to work a day in your life.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I've recently just dealt with a 3rd site near Loch Lomond where I suspected P. lateralis was the culprit, the Lawsons were either killed outright stone dead or infected by the pathogen, it seems to be spreading fast. Forestry Commission visited the site twice and took samples, definitely P. lateralis.

 

If it does take hold in a big way it will see the loss of probably to most important garden conifer in the UK.

 

Unless treatments are done by arborists unhindered by "kill all the hosts and then the problem is solved" approach by government agencies that follow the fire-fighting model. :thumbdown: This approach tried and failed with Emerald Ash Borer in the US, and set back field research for years.

 

Treatments from the textbook Diseases of Trees and Shrubs, p. 356-366: In the soil, increase aeration, drainage, calcium, and microbial activity. On the tree, prune out dead tissue and heat infected areas. :gasthrower:

 

This is not rocket surgery, with no bogeyman of chemical usage involved. :001_tt2: re that aversion, it seems a curious for an agency to shrink from soil drenches, citing general environmental concerns, whilst advocating, even mandating, the removal of perfectly functional trees that are temporarily colonised.

 

Where's the calculation of the environmental damage caused by the loss of the tree? Not to mention the oil and smoke spewed by the machines, and the soil disturbance needed to get the job done. How's all that compare with dilute fungistats? :001_rolleyes:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Unless treatments are done by arborists unhindered by "kill all the hosts and then the problem is solved" approach by government agencies that follow the fire-fighting model. :thumbdown: This approach tried and failed with Emerald Ash Borer in the US, and set back field research for years.

 

Treatments from the textbook Diseases of Trees and Shrubs, p. 356-366: In the soil, increase aeration, drainage, calcium, and microbial activity. On the tree, prune out dead tissue and heat infected areas. :gasthrower:

 

This is not rocket surgery, with no bogeyman of chemical usage involved. :001_tt2: re that aversion, it seems a curious for an agency to shrink from soil drenches, citing general environmental concerns, whilst advocating, even mandating, the removal of perfectly functional trees that are temporarily colonised.

 

Where's the calculation of the environmental damage caused by the loss of the tree? Not to mention the oil and smoke spewed by the machines, and the soil disturbance needed to get the job done. How's all that compare with dilute fungistats? :001_rolleyes:

 

Guy, are you quoting from Sinclairs 'Diseases of Trees and Shrubs'? I'm still waiting for it to arrive.

 

You've alluded to heating dead tissues in other posts and I've seen one or two youtube videos where you advocate it. I don't believe that I've read this anywhere else, in the mainstream literature. Is this a personal practice of yours or something that is gaining momentum in the States? If it is, can you provide some suggested reading.:thumbup1:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We informed the FC of a case of this recently (see previous thread); they took so long to register their interest that the customer (private) got fed up waiting so we felled it but didn't chip it. It went for incineration.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Featured Adverts

About

Arbtalk.co.uk is a hub for the arboriculture industry in the UK.  
If you're just starting out and you need business, equipment, tech or training support you're in the right place.  If you've done it, made it, got a van load of oily t-shirts and have decided to give something back by sharing your knowledge or wisdom,  then you're welcome too.
If you would like to contribute to making this industry more effective and safe then welcome.
Just like a living tree, it'll always be a work in progress.
Please have a look around, sign up, share and contribute the best you have.

See you inside.

The Arbtalk Team

Follow us

×

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.