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Regularly use deep gobs when sectioning down stems as much easier to knock lengths off as gravity helping you, you need to be more accurate with the cuts as less margin for error. Also use it for felling stripped poles for the same reasons of using centre of gravity to your advantage rather than braying away at wedges.

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Regularly use deep gobs when sectioning down stems as much easier to knock lengths off as gravity helping you, you need to be more accurate with the cuts as less margin for error. Also use it for felling stripped poles for the same reasons of using centre of gravity to your advantage rather than braying away at wedges.

Same as when dismantling or felling stripped poles saves a load of grief with pull lines ...


I would not or very very rarely do it on whole trees though.
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Horses for coarses will depend on the exact circumstances.

 

I wouldnae fancy being the climber in the above pic, althou it depends how big the piece is above the gub.

 

I ****************ing hate cutting tottem poles, u see some harvester drivers leaving them for u thinking there doing u a favour, just a bugger to fell, even worse when he has already had a few goes at cutting it at the butt so u have no idea how far his saw has went in and where any holding wood is and they usually have done that on a few sides too just to add to the fun

 

I've seen others esp on leaning trees get there saws nipped as they try to put a big gub in, so sometimes better to take 2 or 3 bites at it.

 

On small leaners i will use it if no room for holding cuts, but dont normally do it on large trees.

 

On soft  woods some sawmills may not like u putting gubs in 50% throu their logs?

Esp the angle we do gubs taught in this country, in america they will likely be humbolting the tree so log is still decent flat edge no 50% chunks taken out of them, althou the stump is far higher

 

I also think on soft woods there must be a point when the small gub vs bigger gub when u will get extra leverage and lift from ur wedges with a smaller gub, so if u have to wedge a tree anyway ur sometimes better with a small gub.

Sometimes when u see stumps left from other forestry cutters lucky if the gub is 10%, no idea wot the tree looked like standing wieght/lean wise but good exp forestry cutters.

Sad man that i am looknng at others old stumps

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Is that a sycamore or maple he's cut that mega gub in??

Some of the others look a sycamore type growth/shape to them

 

He's a braver man than i cutting a gub that big in a syc, surprised its not went on hin or pinched his saw.

Guessing there can't be much above it or it would of either went or pinched his saw

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Why wouldn’t you do that?  Nothing wrong with cutting a face that big in the right situation.

 

Obviously, experience should tell you when it can / can’t be done.

 

It also looks like a Beech tree to my aging eyes.

 

 

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Is that a sycamore or maple he's cut that mega gub in??
Some of the others look a sycamore type growth/shape to them
 
He's a braver man than i cutting a gub that big in a syc, surprised its not went on hin or pinched his saw.
Guessing there can't be much above it or it would of either went or pinched his saw

It's a video dude , click on the big play button in the middle of the screen.. you see how the cut works and it was beech and I would of done the same with sycamore....
I don't get your problem with poles on sites either, climbed ,stripped and dropped 4 big norways on the edge of a clear fell that they didn't want damaging the oaks they are trying to restore, no timber recovery on the 6 trees we did but all the stripped trees where letterboxed and undermined cog cuts for the big poles that went over absolutely no bother and bang on with minimal wedging whilst the last two we dropped conventionally and whole needed a good pounding to get them to move to the point I was considering going back to the trucks and dragging the jacks out..
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