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lux

Advice from you forestry types please...

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So I have been allocated 3 acres of Larch plantation to fell for a charity based trust. I carry out a reasonable amount of Arb work for them already but they would additionally like me to fell one of their plantations.

The felling is part of a landscape report and plan that is required to achieve certain planning requirements for a new building elsewhere on the site.

It’s rather ridiculous and for a variety of reasons that are not flexible but the larch is to be felled , then replanted with ... Larch.

Access is very good and the felling easy. I will attach a couple of pictures but my main point is where is the best value on the product to be had ..?

The trees are around 60ft tall and not particularly big at DBH so I’d imagine not much use for milling. I only do small scale firewood processing I’d imagine Larch although it’s good firewood to have a low ish value. ( no one in this region sells softwood logs)

I’m thinking Biomass maybe it’s best value.

Post felling the area will be forestry mulched before being replanted.

 

Some of you guys specialise in small

Scale forestry so I thought you may have some advice to share.

 

The spec is a planning condition and therefore not flexible so just advice on the end material please.

 

Thanks in advance IMG_0733.jpg

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8-12' Strainers,
Or split into posts.
Log cabins, beams,
Teepee poles,
1/2" cladding etc etc


Needs to be gone in bulk / artic loads.
Would the relatively small diameter not make it unprofitable for large scale milling ?

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Needs to be gone in bulk / artic loads.
Would the relatively small diameter not make it unprofitable for large scale milling ?

Yes, but it's a durable wood.
Plenty of uses for roundwood that size.
Mainly fencing.
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That is a ridiculous condition, and I don't know anyone commercially planting larch. To do so is madness with the endemic status of phytophthora ramorum.

 

Anyway, if the site is to be mulched, ground impact isn't going to be an issue. I'd just get a harvester in and clear it out in a few days. It's going to be the most economical way of doing it. Whereabouts is the stand? 

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That is a ridiculous condition, and I don't know anyone commercially planting larch. To do so is madness with the endemic status of phytophthora ramorum.
 
Anyway, if the site is to be mulched, ground impact isn't going to be an issue. I'd just get a harvester in and clear it out in a few days. It's going to be the most economical way of doing it. Whereabouts is the stand? 

Entirely ridiculous and a total waste of money and time but there we go that is what it is.

Point is what’s the best profit for selling the timber on ?

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Just now, lux said:


Entirely ridiculous and a total waste of money and time but there we go that is what it is.

Point is what’s the best profit for selling the timber on ?

Chipwood makes pretty good money at the moment. I was asking about location as it'll influence the price a bit. If you were local, we might be able to help with the harvesting or point you in the direction of customers.

 

Larch makes superb firewood, but getting firewood customers to take it is the issue. There would be sawlog material from the stand too.

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Chipwood makes pretty good money at the moment. I was asking about location as it'll influence the price a bit. If you were local, we might be able to help with the harvesting or point you in the direction of customers.
 
Larch makes superb firewood, but getting firewood customers to take it is the issue. There would be sawlog material from the stand too.

The stand is in Surrey.
My initial thoughts were Biomass.

I agree with the firewood situation. Great firewood but the end users won’t buy it in this area. They are drilled into think only hardwood is decent.

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I am surprised that the FC has allowed replanting with larch as a condition of the felling licence. Have they? With phytopthera ramorum everywhere now the Woodland Officers in the north of England won’t sanction it. It would be interesting if you did go into the reasoning behind the scheme, it looks like a waste of good crop felling it so early in its life. 

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Whole tree chip is another option. Phil Newson works around Surrey, 2 snips with the tree shear. Snip, snip!

IMG_20190927_180535.jpg

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