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Lfservices

Ash dieback

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1 hour ago, Lfservices said:

Hi guys. 

 

Am I right in thinking you don't need a Felling license to fell Ash dieback? 

IMG_20190816_171314.jpg

Yes and no, but mostly yes. 

 

My interpretation of the rules is that a tree that is dead, dying or dangerous does not require a licence. All trees suffering from ash dieback fall into that category, though walking around a woodland with an FC forester, he said unless it's stone dead, it should have a licence. Given that the timeframe from first symptoms to completely dead is often months, it seems like a daft line to draw, but that was what I was told.

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I don't know where you are getting the "dying" exemption. I think there is a real need for us all to wait to see if ash (unless dangerous) recover, because if they do they will be the best source of regeneration of ash woodlands locally. So, regardless of there not being a 'dying' exemption, the FC would be right to refuse license applications. Infected does not mean dying in all cases, even if it turns out to be true with the benefit of hindsight. It's not like sanitation felling is going to prevent the spread of Chalara.

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2 hours ago, daltontrees said:

I don't know where you are getting the "dying" exemption. I think there is a real need for us all to wait to see if ash (unless dangerous) recover, because if they do they will be the best source of regeneration of ash woodlands locally. So, regardless of there not being a 'dying' exemption, the FC would be right to refuse license applications. Infected does not mean dying in all cases, even if it turns out to be true with the benefit of hindsight. It's not like sanitation felling is going to prevent the spread of Chalara.

I agree totally . However I was speaking to Mark Oden yesterday ( MJO Forestry )  and he said if its got it it will die eventually . How much of this statement is commercially based I don't know . He has felled thoudands on tones and is currently enjoying a boom in the round wood sales . 

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Recent guidance from FC is that 60% canopy loss is acceptable under DDD.

 

"

Thanks for getting in touch with the Forestry Commission on this matter.

 

If your ash trees are clearly dead or are showing at least 60% canopy dieback, then we are classifying this as not requiring a licence due to being dangerous. The trees would also need to affect a third party. If any ash don’t fit within this exemption, then a licence will be required. You are also allowed to fell any trees without a licence up to 5 cubic meters in volume every calendar quarter.

 

It is recommended that you evidence your work via reports and photographs before any work starts so that you can demonstrate best practice in case you are challenged down the line."
 

 

Take a few photos before you fell them to cover your back.  There's huge amounts out here. Local estates have taken hundreds of tons out from roadside with not a felling licence in site. It's much cheaper (although still expensive with them being roadside, £1k/day for 21 ton tree shear plus God knows how much for TM) to deal with them sooner rather than later.

Edited by doobin
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4 hours ago, doobin said:

Recent guidance from FC is that 60% canopy loss is acceptable under DDD.

 

"

Thanks for getting in touch with the Forestry Commission on this matter.

 

 

 

If your ash trees are clearly dead or are showing at least 60% canopy dieback, then we are classifying this as not requiring a licence due to being dangerous. The trees would also need to affect a third party. If any ash don’t fit within this exemption, then a licence will be required. You are also allowed to fell any trees without a licence up to 5 cubic meters in volume every calendar quarter.

 

 

 

It is recommended that you evidence your work via reports and photographs before any work starts so that you can demonstrate best practice in case you are challenged down the line."
 

 

Take a few photos before you fell them to cover your back.  There's huge amounts out here. Local estates have taken hundreds of tons out from roadside with not a felling licence in site. It's much cheaper (although still expensive with them being roadside, £1k/day for 21 ton tree shear plus God knows how much for TM) to deal with them sooner rather than later.

I spoke to local fc bloke and he said the same. These are the ones I'd take down as hardly any growth on them 

IMG_20190816_171536.jpg

IMG_20190816_150716.jpg

IMG_20190816_171314.jpg

IMG_20190816_150557.jpg

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11 hours ago, Paul in the woods said:

That's a really useful publication. I sere it clarifies that there is no diseased or dying exemption and tha tthe dangerous exemption should only be used when -

" The ash tree is already clearly affected by ash dieback symptoms; and,

It is within falling distance (i.e. the total height of the tree) of a highway, service network, built infrastructure,or a space with frequent public use and,

The greater part of the crown of the tree is dead; and

Crown reduction works necessary to remove any deadwood would, in the opinion of a qualified professional, significantly harm the vitality (or visual amenity) of the tree.

Additionally, any ash tree showing basal lesions,either with or without evidence of secondary infection e.g. honey fungus,would also fall within the scope of the dangerous tree exception"

 

That's a nice clear set of rules. As with any risk assessment there has to be likelihood of failure and someone or something there to be harmed or damaged.

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