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Len Brennan

Mystery Yew fungus

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I wasn't aware that Phaeolus schweinizii was anamorphic?

 

Given the rarity of some fungi and also the rarity or infrequent sightings of anamorphic forms we can be certain that more species will be found to have anamorphic forms. It wouldnt appear to be not as distinct well formed shelves, but has characters of old dessicated phaeolus, soft spongy blackened looking, but more crustose than we would expect of the dyers mazegill.

 

I didnt say IS said suspect its an anamorph of something, MAYBE because of its current colour and texture appearances might be of Phaeolus, it MAY be, POSSIBLY an anamorph.

 

Its unlike anything ive ever seen, I have no positive identification to offer the OP, BUT I am pretty sure that this is an unusual find, obscure, rare, not common, or worthy of further investigation.

 

Yews are a hardy tough and toxic species, few fungi are found on them, bar the odd Ganoderma carnosum (very rare) most commonly Laetiporus sulphureus (possible a distinct Variety with 16 forms identified genetically) amoung others infrequently.

 

I am very interested because I love fungi and this is for me for my eyes a very unusual and interesting example.

 

just thought i would clear that up as i wouldnt want you to think im a total moron or anything:001_rolleyes:

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Given the rarity of some fungi and also the rarity or infrequent sightings of anamorphic forms we can be certain that more species will be found to have anamorphic forms. It wouldnt appear to be not as distinct well formed shelves, but has characters of old dessicated phaeolus, soft spongy blackened looking, but more crustose than we would expect of the dyers mazegill.

 

I didnt say IS said suspect its an anamorph of something, MAYBE because of its current colour and texture appearances might be of Phaeolus, it MAY be, POSSIBLY an anamorph.

 

Its unlike anything ive ever seen, I have no positive identification to offer the OP, BUT I am pretty sure that this is an unusual find, obscure, rare, not common, or worthy of further investigation.

 

Yews are a hardy tough and toxic species, few fungi are found on them, bar the odd Ganoderma carnosum (very rare) most commonly Laetiporus sulphureus (possible a distinct Variety with 16 forms identified genetically) amoung others infrequently.

 

I am very interested because I love fungi and this is for me for my eyes a very unusual and interesting example.

 

just thought i would clear that up as i wouldnt want you to think im a total moron or anything:001_rolleyes:

 

That has cleared nothing up, you have tried to baffle brains with meaningless gobledygook and again state the obvious.

 

My question was, "does Phaeolus Schweinitzii have an anamorph" ?!

 

The answer is very simple, requiring a maximum of ONLY three letters

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That has cleared nothing up, you have tried to baffle brains with meaningless gobledygook and again state the obvious.

> Really?!

 

My question was, "does Phaeolus Schweinitzii have an anamorph" ?!

 

The answer is very simple, requiring a maximum of ONLY three letters

 

> Is it not clear from the 'gobbledygook' that he (and maybe no one, anywhere) knows if P schweinitzii has an anamorphic form? He suspects (as with many quirks of fungi) it may have been undiscovered; or at least not reported and confirmed. So 'maybe' or ' I do not know' would be the short answers. Both more than three letters!

The trouble with fungi (or that which makes them interesting to study) is they are largely short lived, and not many people, particularly in this fungiphobic UK, know an unusual specimen or discovery from a bog standard one; or how to go about sampling and further investigating.

 

Hope that clears things up a bit...

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That has cleared nothing up, you have tried to baffle brains with meaningless gobledygook and again state the obvious.

> Really?!

 

My question was, "does Phaeolus Schweinitzii have an anamorph" ?!

 

The answer is very simple, requiring a maximum of ONLY three letters

 

> Is it not clear from the 'gobbledygook' that he (and maybe no one, anywhere) knows if P schweinitzii has an anamorphic form? He suspects (as with many quirks of fungi) it may have been undiscovered; or at least not reported and confirmed. So 'maybe' or ' I do not know' would be the short answers. Both more than three letters!

The trouble with fungi (or that which makes them interesting to study) is they are largely short lived, and not many people, particularly in this fungiphobic UK, know an unusual specimen or discovery from a bog standard one; or how to go about sampling and further investigating.

 

Hope that clears things up a bit...

 

Is that the best you can do Sloth, his original quote was " suspect its anamorph"!

 

To add any credibility to what you have written he would have had to say, I suspect that P. schwenitzii has two stages of fruiting and this is the anamorph!

 

Every reader and his dog knows the truth here Sloth!

 

Imagine if someone else wrote that s***, he would have been down their throats like a fat old Matron, I have seen this so many times and it makes me want to vomit and it will not stop until the unnecessary pampering stops

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