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openspaceman
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I think "hazard beam crack" is understood in this industry but was something lost in the translation from German?

 

Anyway this is where the glue holding bundles of fibres together tears along wood's weakest plane, the reason why cleaving works.

 

Two pictures below of a tree I have passed for 30 odd years since it resisted the storm in 1987 or 91, I don't recall it at the actual time.

 

fibreseparation.jpg.07933987c7e44dd62291040080a566bd.jpg

 

You will see how the lateral root attached to the buttress has held as an anchor as the tree has bent in the wind, the stress has caused the hazard beam crack from Mattheck's book and as the buttress has straightened to take the strain the lateral force has cause the fibre separation and the tree has survived.

 

reactioncolumns.jpg.1dc22e08d81e8ac18baec33a806284b2.jpg

 

Looking round the opposite side you can see how two columns of reaction wood have formed on the compression side ( it is expected in a pine) to compensate for the increase stress in bending the crack has caused to the remaining original stem These columns do not reach the ground so only reinforce the stem above ground but there doesn't seem to be much compensatory growth of the now separate buttress.

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i thought a hazard beam crack was exactly that, a crack in a hazard beam...

 

a hazard beam being a longitudinal or photo-tropic branch that has grown too long for its own weight

 

If you look at

http://www.mattheck.de/english/vtabook1.jpg

you will see he labels the crack in the buttress as a hazard beam too.

 

I can accept beam being a long horizontal branch and that if it gets too long for its own strength it presents a hazard but...

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If you look at

http://www.mattheck.de/english/vtabook1.jpg

you will see he labels the crack in the buttress as a hazard beam too.

 

I can accept beam being a long horizontal branch and that if it gets too long for its own strength it presents a hazard but...

 

Does that pine need action? If not, it's not a hazard, by definition of the term.

 

This oak is hollow as a drum and needed action. Pruned 15% to lessen lean; that was 5 years ago; owner is fine with it.

crack oak.doc

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Does that pine need action? If not, it's not a hazard, by definition of the term.

 

Semantics but because of the low occupancy and the fact it is still standing it's a low risk.

This oak is hollow as a drum and needed action. Pruned 15% to lessen lean; that was 5 years ago; owner is fine with it.

 

 

That is a different beast though, a shear crack, where the fibres at the meeting of the compression side and the tension side have dislocated in shear. Still a good example though.

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Semantics but because of the low occupancy and the fact it is still standing it's a low risk."

 

The thread was about terminology; how doth that differ from semantics?

 

"That is a different beast though, a shear crack, where the fibres at the meeting of the compression side and the tension side have dislocated in shear. Still a good example though."

 

mmmall the action seems to be on the tension side. but the main thing is, a lot of these terms get lost in translation, even when the lingo is the same. each tree is different, and vta tuning into "defects" can become a witch hunt if not balanced with tuning into response and adaptation.

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Semantics but because of the low occupancy and the fact it is still standing it's a low risk."

 

The thread was about terminology; how doth that differ from semantics?

Touché

 

 

"That is a different beast though, a shear crack, where the fibres at the meeting of the compression side and the tension side have dislocated in shear. Still a good example though."

 

mmmall the action seems to be on the tension side. but the main thing is, a lot of these terms get lost in translation, even when the lingo is the same. each tree is different, and vta tuning into "defects" can become a witch hunt if not balanced with tuning into response and adaptation.

 

I'm not sure which picture you are referring to when you say that.

 

Anyway that was my question, was something lost in translation? The only image I saw on the site of the same picture but with other language seemed to be in Japanese

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I'm not sure which picture you are referring to when you say that.
none at all; that comment was expanding into generalization. that's the internet for you...

Anyway that was my question, was something lost in translation?

Yes totally; inevitables.

 

i did nto see Japanese, tho i might have mistaken it for Javascript.

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