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David Humphries

Mindless tree vandalism

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I remember being young, foolish & barely full of any common sense.

There are probably one or two things I did in my youth that I'm still non too proud of. :blushing:

 

But no way would I ever have been so stupid & ignorant as to set fire to what is obviously (surely even in the eyes of a ignoramous) a thing of natural beauty.

 

What is it that switches off, when perpetrators of ugliness to this magnitude kick off ? :confused1:

 

This centuries old pollard will probably survive this particular trauma, but I doubt the plethora of wildlife that was within it did :thumbdown:

 

 

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Education education education

 

Youth have no idea how long things such has that have been around or the importance of it.

 

If you told them to write on a slip of paper how old they thought it was, I can guarantee you would get answers such a 10 years? 20 years?

 

You would ale are a good teacher David and think you are missing your vocation in life, you should be touring the local schools doing presentations and educating them before they turn into lumps of knife carrying pork

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Education education education

 

Youth have no idea how long things such has that have been around or the importance of it.

 

If you told them to write on a slip of paper how old they thought it was, I can guarantee you would get answers such a 10 years? 20 years?

 

You would ale are a good teacher David and think you are missing your vocation in life, you should be touring the local schools doing presentations and educating them before they turn into lumps of knife carrying pork

 

Yup. "It's just a tree..."

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Fungus   
to set fire to what is obviously (surely even in the eyes of a ignoramous) a thing of natural beauty. This centuries old pollard will probably survive this particular trauma, but I doubt the plethora of wildlife that was within it did.

 

Criminal behaviour IMO. In The Netherlands vandals set fire to one of the nicest old hollow Castanea's, called the kabouterboom (pixie tree), that luckely escaped from burning down to the ground because of a timely intervention.

Edited by Fungus

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Fabulous tree, what a mindless act. No doubt the perpetrators have no idea what they have done.

What was the management plan for this tree in terms of re-establishing the pollard and will the plan now change? That is assuming it is on your patch, but an interesting question anyway. Will the damage from the fire have reduced the energy available to the tree to respond to re pollarding or reduction?

Can you tell us what the physiological consequences of fire damage are likely to be? There is the obvious damage to bark and cambium and breach of barrier zones but is there anything else? Is there a loss of stored energy reserves? I guess there must be??

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Education education education

 

Youth have no idea how long things such has that have been around or the importance of it.

 

If you told them to write on a slip of paper how old they thought it was, I can guarantee you would get answers such a 10 years? 20 years?

 

You would ale are a good teacher David and think you are missing your vocation in life, you should be touring the local schools doing presentations and educating them before they turn into lumps of knife carrying pork

 

I have to agree (shock horror) with Dean, you are a natural teacher David.:thumbup1:

 

Fabulous tree, what a mindless act. No doubt the perpetrators have no idea what they have done.

What was the management plan for this tree in terms of re-establishing the pollard and will the plan now change? That is assuming it is on your patch, but an interesting question anyway. Will the damage from the fire have reduced the energy available to the tree to respond to re pollarding or reduction?

Can you tell us what the physiological consequences of fire damage are likely to be? There is the obvious damage to bark and cambium and breach of barrier zones but is there anything else? Is there a loss of stored energy reserves? I guess there must be??

 

some very very good and interesting questions there, Trees tend to do fairly well in-spite of such events given enough time to recover and enough residual wall thickness. CODIT wal 4 is probably re instigated at such an event as it is in a pollard, shock and dysfunction induced. though that as you allude to take energy from the system, trees tend to use energy in defence last in the chain of priorities so if the budget is low, defence is weak. I think this oak will be O.k, but oaks are hardy and even lightning rarely hurts them terminally, Ash and beech for example fair less well in these situations.

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On a similar thread of thought, I have recently been told about the practice of burning wooden posts before installing them in the ground, as a barrier against decay. Interesting idea, has anyone come across this before? I imagine this removes or degrades the compounds in the cell walls that decay fungi feast on.

Anyone got any info. on that?

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Education education education

 

Youth have no idea how long things such has that have been around or the importance of it.

 

If you told them to write on a slip of paper how old they thought it was, I can guarantee you would get answers such a 10 years? 20 years?

 

You would ale are a good teacher David and think you are missing your vocation in life, you should be touring the local schools doing presentations and educating them before they turn into lumps of knife carrying pork

 

On a similar thread of thought, I have recently been told about the practice of burning wooden posts before installing them in the ground, as a barrier against decay. Interesting idea, has anyone come across this before? I imagine this removes or degrades the compounds in the cell walls that decay fungi feast on.

Anyone got any info. on that?

 

no, but I would assume a layer of pure carbon would be a niche for very few organisms of the fungal kind, like rhizina

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no, but I would assume a layer of pure carbon would be a niche for very few organisms of the fungal kind, like rhizina

Perhaps a better alternative to other treatments for decay.

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