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David Humphries

To Mulch, or not to Mulch?

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Oh, yes.

 

One thing I noticed about the most recent picture is that the nicely arranged cuttings from the deadwood reduction had been reduced to just one small section.

 

I know I have mentioned this in past posts, but the diversity of the decomposing matter needs to be maintained. As we know, trees are self-optimizing as much as possible. But this tree, in the condition its in now, is doing well just to survive, let alone supply significant amounts of soil exudates.

 

I know you know all this, but for others who are interested in this thread, should find this link informative. I find this explains the complexities here very well. The balance of the soil organisms is this tree's best bet.

 

Soil Foodweb

 

 

Dave

 

Soil Foodweb

 

Sorry, this can be a bit tedious reading and I linked the wrong section. The above link is more to the point.

 

Dave

 

Great little site, thanks for posting.

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David whats the extension growth like?

 

 

 

That's a fine question Lee.

 

Guess I should of taken some measurements prior to the work & then subsequently after.

 

 

Haven't been up in the crown, but last years extension growth on the basal & trunk epicormic varies,

but is up toward the 30cm mark on the more vigorous shoots.

 

 

There appears to be quite a bit of epi throughout the canopy.

Not alot of advantitious growth at the prunning cuts.

 

Will put some pictures up when it flowers & when the buds have burst.

 

May have a dig down into the mulch to see what gives :001_smile:

 

 

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Beautiful! I think the old girl was very lucky to have found you.

 

Dave

 

 

 

Howdee Dave, hope things are well with you and your good lady?

 

 

 

The Pear is at a happy place currently.

 

It's interesting comparing the vitality of this tree with a couple of much younger trees adjacent.

 

Flower bud to leaf bud ratio apears much higher in the older tree.

I think this is possibly due to the need to invest in growing more by the young ones, hence the need for more energy producing material.

Whereas the old girl is where she needs to be & is now at a stage where it's main stratergy is about sustainability & reproduction.

 

My gut feeling is that this tree would have perished (if not by now, within a relatively short time span), if we hadn't intervened & persevered.

 

& tbh, it's not been a huge investment, just a bit of tlc & time :thumbup1:

 

 

 

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