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My first MEWP


doobin
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Only a little one (ooh matron!). Not much use for trees I know, but really I bought it for property maintenance and the odd large hedge reduction or little dead ash. 
 

Did a bit of research before buying but mainly bought it because it seemed cheap and I found myself with five jobs lined up for it. It’s an older machine (2003) but has only done 250 hours. Nice and simple. Found a great firm near me who came and did its 6 month inspection yesterday and said it looks a nice tight machine with genuine low hours. Great service from Aerial and Handing Services Ltd. I need a few bits to tidy it up and I’m also very impressed with how proactive the spares suppliers are. Not bad prices at all on the basic parts either, and hopefully nothing too expensive to go wrong with such an early model. 

 

Oil and Steel Octopussy 1250. £8.5k. 890mm wide which I think is about as narrow as a mewp gets? It’s also the twin boom model which I didn’t realise but I see that gives more ‘up and over’ reach for buildings etc. Managed to get myself stuck against the barn wall at the yard which was embarrassing so there’s something not quite right, possibly operator! I’m assuming that it was trying to lower the parallel lift ram of the twin boom before the one that pulls you back, which isn’t ideal. Managed to coax it into dropping the right ram by pushing the teleboom out against the wall which is even less idea.. Learning curve! 
 

 I’ve always hated renting the cumbersome trailer mounted units. Now I own one it can sit on site until the job is done at leisure. 
 

Photo of the tree work is from the listing, not me. 

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Edited by doobin
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9 minutes ago, woody paul said:

Great little machine, used one quite a bit to do trees. They are narrow and do have a habit of tip on there side. 

I’m hoping you mean whilst tracking it about 🤣 yeah it’s all a compromise but I’d rather take a bit of Time to level up the path and be able to fit through a gate. 

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I changed my trailer mounted MEWP for a tracked one earlier this year. The most scary thing we have done so far was making a temporary ramp to get it down two steps in a narrow gap. Couldn't have the outriggers down for that. Fantastic compared to the old one. Have positioned it between graves in churchyard to dismantle dying sycamore. 

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40 minutes ago, maybelateron said:

Have positioned it between graves in churchyard to dismantle dying sycamore. 

I am really curious to know how you felt that was a safe thing to do? Surely there are many voids in a graveyard, and despite placing the outriggers between graves as you say, surely there is a risk of sideways collapse of the pressurised (by the weight on the outrigger pads) soil into those voids ?

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4 hours ago, dangb93 said:

Fold the appropriate outrigger legs down when tracking around on uneven surfaces, if space will allow

That's OK if you are not trying to get it through narrow gap. Have had to fix rope to one in the past and wrap it around tree just in case. 

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4 hours ago, dangb93 said:

I am really curious to know how you felt that was a safe thing to do? Surely there are many voids in a graveyard, and despite placing the outriggers between graves as you say, surely there is a risk of sideways collapse of the pressurised (by the weight on the outrigger pads) soil into those voids ?

Use of oversized outrigger pads.

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Just now, maybelateron said:
4 hours ago, dangb93 said:

I am really curious to know how you felt that was a safe thing to do? Surely there are many voids in a graveyard, and despite placing the outriggers between graves as you say, surely there is a risk of sideways collapse of the pressurised (by the weight on the outrigger pads) soil into those voids ?

Use of oversized outrigger pads.

Also the fact that this part of the graveyard only has very old graves, ie 250yrs or older. Plenty of time for soil to move and fill in where the coffin once was.

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  • 2 weeks later...

‘Babies first MEWP’ is all tested and making life easier. Big shout out to Aerial and Handling LTD who are a wealth of knowledge and did the LOLER.
 

Typically I already wish I’d bought bigger. But 8.5k isn’t to be sniffed at, there are two similar 14m machines for sale currently and they both want 13/14k. Can hire a lot of larger mewps for that price differential. 
 

My favourite way of clearing up hedge cuttings too. 
 

Quite liking the new M18 top handle! Loads of torque and power, eats batteries as you would expect though! Will pick up charger when I take this load back to the yard. 

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