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RichSutherland

Beech Tree - Doesn't look good

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6 minutes ago, Mick Dempsey said:

Good idea, it would be nice if you came back to tell us what the report says and your decision.

 

It gives us a kind of closure.

 

Mick

Absolutely - will do!

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Hi All, 

 

We asked Jerry Ross, who was recommended by Cobbs Tree & Estate (thank you) on this thread, to complete a survey and he has just sent an update over by email. Unfortunately the tree is 2/3rds dead and definitely needs to come down. It also has traces of honey fungus which he says potentially could spread to the other mature Beech tree, to minimise the chances of this the stump should be grinded down. 

 

I've just sent the bad news over to the estate agents to pass on to the owners, hopefully we can take on responsibility for this financial burden together and get the issue resolved, but it's pretty sad news.

 

I was wondering if there are any recommendations in the Hereford area for surgeons to quote to cut the tree back and grind the stump out. Traffic management will definitely be needed so looking for someone who can factor that in. Ideally would like a couple of reputable people to quote to satisfy both us and the current owners as I expect it will not be cheap. 

 

Appreciate any help/recommendations!

 

Thanks,
Rich

 

 

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35 minutes ago, RichSutherland said:

Hi All, 

 

We asked Jerry Ross, who was recommended by Cobbs Tree & Estate (thank you) on this thread, to complete a survey and he has just sent an update over by email. Unfortunately the tree is 2/3rds dead and definitely needs to come down. It also has traces of honey fungus which he says potentially could spread to the other mature Beech tree, to minimise the chances of this the stump should be grinded down. 

 

I've just sent the bad news over to the estate agents to pass on to the owners, hopefully we can take on responsibility for this financial burden together and get the issue resolved, but it's pretty sad news.

 

I was wondering if there are any recommendations in the Hereford area for surgeons to quote to cut the tree back and grind the stump out. Traffic management will definitely be needed so looking for someone who can factor that in. Ideally would like a couple of reputable people to quote to satisfy both us and the current owners as I expect it will not be cheap. 

 

Appreciate any help/recommendations!

 

Thanks,
Rich

 

 

Without wishing to muddy the waters (😂

 

You may have inadvertently started (another) sub discussion about the potential pros v cons of stump grinding in relation to the prevention of spread of honey fungus 😳

 

Id question whether stump grinding would be an effective means of preventing the potential for HF to spread to nearby trees. 
 

If it has a nutritional source within the existing stump, it may just stay there whereas if you remove that nutritional source (by grinding it out) it is compelled to seek sustenance elsewhere. 
 

Ive never been able to get a firm discussion / conclusion on this subject (even after asking Guy) but if I quote from  the field guide:

 

”....can spread from stumps and roots to surrounding trees particularly if there is a lack of natural suppression in the form of fallen deadwood colonised by other fungi performing naturals suppression...”

 

So if you retain the original ‘food’ source and retain a good deadwood pile, is that more or less likely to encourage translocation to nearby trees?

 

That’s the fuse lit 💣 😂

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1 hour ago, RichSutherland said:

Hi All, 

 

We asked Jerry Ross, who was recommended by Cobbs Tree & Estate (thank you) on this thread, to complete a survey and he has just sent an update over by email. Unfortunately the tree is 2/3rds dead and definitely needs to come down. It also has traces of honey fungus which he says potentially could spread to the other mature Beech tree, to minimise the chances of this the stump should be grinded down. 

 

I've just sent the bad news over to the estate agents to pass on to the owners, hopefully we can take on responsibility for this financial burden together and get the issue resolved, but it's pretty sad news.

 

I was wondering if there are any recommendations in the Hereford area for surgeons to quote to cut the tree back and grind the stump out. Traffic management will definitely be needed so looking for someone who can factor that in. Ideally would like a couple of reputable people to quote to satisfy both us and the current owners as I expect it will not be cheap. 

 

Appreciate any help/recommendations!

 

Thanks,
Rich

 

 

I've pulled the topic of stump grinding away from your thread to stop it getting cluttered but you might like to look in here if it gains traction: 

 

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Thanks Kevin - sorry to keep triggering new topics :) 

 

To be honest we really wouldn't want a big dead tree stump right at the front of the house anyway, also as part of the TPO we may be required to plant another (although we would want to do this ourselves regardless). 

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The RHS is worth a looking at for Honey Fungus advice. Some info about what to do (they suggest removing stumps and roots) and they also provide a list of less susceptible trees which may be of interest.

 

https://www.rhs.org.uk/advice/garden-health/disease/Honey-fungus

https://www.rhs.org.uk/advice/pdfs/honey-fungus-host-list

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24 minutes ago, Paul in the woods said:

The RHS is worth a looking at for Honey Fungus advice. Some info about what to do (they suggest removing stumps and roots) and they also provide a list of less susceptible trees which may be of interest.

 

https://www.rhs.org.uk/advice/garden-health/disease/Honey-fungus

https://www.rhs.org.uk/advice/pdfs/honey-fungus-host-list

This is a more detailed piece than that presented by RHS.

 

https://www.trees.org.uk/Trees.org.uk/files/d7/d73bbf00-b534-42bf-a417-17f5055c2ab3.pdf

 

RHS advice on burying a barrier is somewhat vague and lacking detail since you’d need to know the extent of the subterranean rhizomorphs for it to be effective.

 

“…Stumps which cannot be dug out can, if access allows, be chipped or ground out with a machine designed for the purpose (see under Tree Work in the /Yellow Pages).

 

Large unchipped pieces, particularly of the roots, often remain. These should be dug out.

 

The efficacy of these measures depends entirely on the thoroughness with which infected material is removed or destroyed: the larger and more numerous the remaining fragments, the greater and more prolonged the risk of reinfection.

 

The mixture of chips and soil which remains after stump chipping probably constitutes little danger as a Honey fungus source but if it is not removed, replanting should be delayed for 12 months or until no rhizomorphs are to be found in the mixture.

 

If you know or suspect that larger buried segments of root remain after chipping or excavation, delay planting trees or shrubs within 30 yards of the excavation for at least 2 years, longer if possible. Annuals may be safely grown on the site meanwhile. Alternatively, replant with resistant species..”

Edited by kevinjohnsonmbe

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