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Thanks Steve. So grind these at an angle? Bill posted a photo but i just cant see it right.
Cant get it to focus if i zoom in too much. Here is a pic of standard heel and ground heel. The back of the cutter is filed ( i actually used a grinder but flat file works just boring)20190716_172706.jpeg20190716_172727.jpeg
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Jeez I am happy I joined this forum. I just read Mick Burns info about the chains and learned a quite a lot. Now I know what you guys are talking about. I have been looking at chainsaw carving sites and videos and not once did I read or hear any thing like this. And I have been looking for info like this but its apparrently hard to find, or hard for me to find. Any other sites or videos you guys might know about that you think I might learn something from please send me a link to me. I really appreciate the help you guys have given me. I have been using chainsaws for years cutting our winters wood but gave that up probably 20 years ago due to medical reasons.

Cheers, Leonard

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Back again guys. What way would a fella go about grinding the backs off the carving chain? Would my four inch grinder do the job or would that create too much heat to the tooth?

Thanks, Leonard

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Just read the posts again and saw where Bill said he used a grinder on the teeth.
Sorry
I used a battery grinder with a 1mm cutting disc. Go easy, very easy to bungle it and take the chrome off the tooth/ get wrong angle. I'd do a few with a flat file first.


Also worth doing some bore cuts without having done it so you can compare before and after effect

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Thank you again Bill. I used a Ram micromotor to grind them off. Used a small stone and it went pretty good. Used saw yesterday and it makes a big difference. Here’s a photo of my first masterpiece. Very rough but the wood is rotten and I need to get used to using a chainsaw for doing this and not for just cutting firewood. I think he will be heading for the wood stove.

Cheers

 

 

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Hey guys, just wanted to get your opinion on using aspen wood for chainsaw carving.

Good or bad or in between? What do you consider the best wood for carving? I live in Newfoundland so we have big aspens , fair sized birch, black and white spruce and good sized tamarack. Thanks

 

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