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Hello everybody,

Just received my Cannon bar, a chain and sprocket for my little Stihl MS170 yesterday. Just wondering if anybody could share some tips and tricks you have learned from carving experience over the years. Or possibly any links to good websites I could check out to learn anything about chainsaw carving.

Cheers, Leonard in Newfoundland 

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Hi Leonard,

ok, first off, run your carving chain slack otherwise you’ll overheat the bar and chain.

secondly you may need to grind/file the heels/ backs of the cutters as sometimes they can stick out more than the cutting face as they travel round the bar tip.

Start simple, mushrooms, owls.

watch YouTube videos and join carving groups on Facebook.

most of all though study form of your subject matter, lots of photos so you have plenty of good reference material. Copying someone else’s work may lead to you copying their mistakes 🤣

Best of luck,

Simon 

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Ed robinson used to have a brilliant webpage on carving tips, cant find it now, mick burns might have some good info on his.

As simon says, watch the chain tension, watch out for a bar tip that is burning hot/smoking/ slinging black oil off as it will quickly deteriorate. Also bore cuts will heat it up quicker. May help not to run the saw on full chat too much while your finding your way with correct tension. Basically treat it gentle, dont bury the tip the twist it about hard etc.

Few pics here of chain tension and ground off heals

Enjoy!20190716_142212.jpeg20190716_142239.jpeg

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Thanks guys, appreciate the tips. Yes I have my chain very slack but never knew about grinding down the heals. Gonna do that and see if it helps.

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Forgot to say that I have been carving small wood spirits and Santa’s for while now. Also carved moose antler for while too. I think I just need to get used to using a chainsaw instead of a little chisel, gonna take a lot of practice I think. Thanks again.

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Thanks guys, appreciate the tips. Yes I have my chain very slack but never knew about grinding down the heals. Gonna do that and see if it helps.
Grinding the heels off backs boring easier and tip of bar gets less hot.

Knowing when to out the saw down and get the chisels out is an art in itself!

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Ok guys, stupid question, for me anyway. I thought you were referring to rakers when you were talking about the heels of the chain. I am new to this so please go easy on me. Are you referring to the end of the cutting teeth? Could you please post another photo or diagram of this?

Thanks

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