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ArrowHead

Very Large Copper Beech Tree's

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HI 

 

Some advice if possible 

 

I have 3 very large copper Beech tree's less than 12 feet from my house. They are my responsibility and all have TPO's. My house was built in 1904 and has a very large crack in the front bay that a structural engineer has reported to say is caused by the tree along with other structural cracks of significance again reportedly due to the tree's 

The Tree's overhang my roof by some margin and have steel supports within the crown I presume to help strengthen the structure of the tree 

I'm concerned about my house and the potential of the roots to cause subsidence along with them potentially falling onto the house . The tree's are 50-60ft in height. I want to discuss replacing them with the council. Is this a waste of time ? Planted after the house was built its been suggested but no way to prove that or even if that makes a difference. The 3rd tree is further away and whilst the surface roots no doubt are under the garage doesn't appear to be so much of a concern as the other 2 

Is it worth discussing with the council ? 

 

Best 

 

AH 

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Difficult one this. Looks like trees grew up with yr house. What has the structural engineer said abt the soil report ? K

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Get your insurance company involved. They will deal with the council who will need to be involved as the trees are TPO'd.

 

Soils are one of the key factors in subsidence. Highly shrinkable clay soils can be a problem.

 

Just because the structural engineer has said the tree is the cause doesn't mean the tree is the problem. It just means they can see the tree, which makes it easy to blame. Other less obvious things commonly cause subsidence.

 

Unless you have undertaken a detailed investigation, which can take 12 months, and ruled out all other possibilities you could find yourself wasting money focusing on the tree and not resolving the real problem.

Edited by EdwardC
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Definitely check yr drains. Any nearby soakaway-which with the age of that house could still exist. House will not have heave protection. Without a test pit and dimensions I could not offer a view. Root barriering  could be an option. Living with the crack could be an option too. K

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Is it not acceptable to replace the tree's with ones more in keeping with residential area ? Is it dangerous to the tree for me to replace the drive way around them If they stay ? I'm concerned digging around will disturb the roots. Currently its just dirt as I dug up the paving due to it being disturbed. 2 of the tree's are about 14ft apart and I wanted to dig between them to create a better entrance to the house . Is that possible without disturbing the roots and damaging the tree's ? Would need to dig down about 2 feet i'd say. 

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7 hours ago, ArrowHead said:

Is it not acceptable to replace the tree's with ones more in keeping with residential area

For a definitive answer put an application in to the council to fell the trees and replace them with 'ones, [you think are], more in keeping with residential area'

 

7 hours ago, ArrowHead said:

Is it dangerous to the tree for me to replace the drive way around them If they stay ?

Not if done properly.

 

7 hours ago, ArrowHead said:

2 of the tree's are about 14ft apart and I wanted to dig between them to create a better entrance to the house . Is that possible without disturbing the roots and damaging the tree's ? Would need to dig down about 2 feet i'd say. 

Damage will occur if you start digging. Most roots are quite close to the surface, top 1m or so. Get an arboricultral consultant to advise on installing a suitable hard surface for your entrance.

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Some good advice up here.  I would also urge caution about digging around roots.  The TPO also extends to what is below ground as much as the stem and canopy.  Should you do anything that will damage them and the trees die without the consent of the council you could end up in serious trouble.  My advice would be to try and arrange a site meeting with your engineer and arb consultant and the tree officer.

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