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2017 roundup: Productivity vs Injury Rates

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HAIX Footwear UK

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Between 2016/17, 802,000 trees were planted across England, an increase from the 642,000 trees planted in 2015/16. This follows the Conservative government pledge in 2015 to plant 11 million trees by 2020.

 

To work safely and efficiently, coping with strenuous workloads in such busy times, you must be protected.  Wearing the appropriate safety footwear is critical and can reduce the likelihood of you suffering an injury or developing a health condition whilst at work. 

 

Injuries and Illness in 2017

 

The Health and Safety Executive (HSE) 2016/17 statistics show in the forestry, agriculture and fishing sector, 15,000 workers suffered from work-related illnesses with 12,000 non-fatal injuries and 27 fatal injuries. The figures reveal safety gaps in this industry, highlighting where more could be done to improve protection. 

 

There are also pressing health issues that must be considered. The HSE statistics also show musculoskeletal (MSK) disorders were the most common work-related ill health condition to workers across the three sectors, accounting for 46% of all ill health problem, significantly higher than all other industries. Many of these cases could be linked to unsupportive footwear, lacking appropriate protection and safety features, ultimately making your working life a lot more difficult. 

 

MSK- where are we now?

 

MSK disorders can develop through wearing safety footwear that is not fit for purpose and can damage joints, causing swelling of the legs. This could result in a range of problems for the feet including bunions and corns, steel spurs and even flat feet.  General pain and discomfort around feet, legs, hips and lower back is also likely. If these problems develop all areas of your life could be affected. This might prevent you from working, possibly leading to a lack of earnings

 

Focus on footwear

 

Protective, durable and comfortable footwear is essential for your safety, helping to prevent injuries whilst also ensuring you don’t suffer from long term health problems because of work. HAIX is committed to developing functional footwear features for forestry professionals, meeting end user demand, continually setting new trends and exceeding standards to reduce health issues. 

 

Every pair of boots incorporates the latest materials and footwear technology to offer comfort and protection, with cutting-edge design. Key features in our boots that will help prevent MSK injuries and improve safety generally include:

 

  • higher quality materials for better support to the foot and lower leg
  • arch support to ensure correct posture
  • sturdy soles to give a strong platform for a range of surfaces
  • Gore-Tex membrane keeping feet warm and dry. 
  • chainsaw cut protection 

 

2018 

 

Busy times are ahead for the forestry industry and HAIX boots could be the key, helping to reduce incident rates and improve health statistics, ensuring continued growth in the forestry industry.

 

Invest in HAIX boots and protect your health as well as the success of your industry. For more information visit, https://www.haix.co.uk

 

 

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15 Comments


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7 hours ago, Silver Back said:

Tongues out for chips in ;)

Pardon?

 

It amuses me to see an ad mentioning safety with a chap posing with a saw in a way that would fail his basic assessment

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On 28/01/2018 at 17:21, openspaceman said:

Pardon?

 

It amuses me to see an ad mentioning safety with a chap posing with a saw in a way that would fail his basic assessment

When I did my assessment - I was a bugger fr leaving my thumb out on handle ( like he is doing ) so assessor ties a rubber band around my thumb to remind me ;) K

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34 minutes ago, Khriss said:

When I did my assessment - I was a bugger fr leaving my thumb out on handle ( like he is doing ) so assessor ties a rubber band around my thumb to remind me ;) K

 

33 minutes ago, Khriss said:

( Summat to do with kickback ? Cant remmebr -was a long time ago )

In the position he is it's not a big problem because if he were unable to control the kickback his hand would be struck by the front guard and trigger the brake. The problem is more pronounced when felling when the hand is on the side of the front handle, if the saw kicks back  th e hand falls toward the bar. At least he is wearing gloves.

 

Many of us do it with no consequences  but it remains a practice that will cause a candidate to fail an assessment. A bit like YO YO starting.

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40 minutes ago, Mick Dempsey said:

His wife will go mad, his socks will be covered in chip.

 

#tongues out for chips in.

 

 

Thanks understood now

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@HAIX Footwear UK thanks for posting, interesting read. 

 

Have you given any thought to increasing the durability of boots? This isn't targeted at you specifically but it seems that boots in general aren't standing up to the test of time like they used to. I'm lucky to get a year out of a pair of saw boots these days where a few years back 2 years was fairly reasonable. Believe me I'm not working any harder than I was back then. 

 

The cynics might acknowledge that its simply not good business to make a product last too long, but when you're paying around £200 a pair I don't think it's unreasonable to expect a decent life span. 

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2 hours ago, Stubby said:

My Pfanner Zermatts are lasting well .......

 I'm happy to hear that mate.

 

Respectfully, you are retired though...

  • Haha 2

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On 25/02/2018 at 18:46, Joe Newton said:

@HAIX Footwear UK thanks for posting, interesting read. 

 

Have you given any thought to increasing the durability of boots? This isn't targeted at you specifically but it seems that boots in general aren't standing up to the test of time like they used to. I'm lucky to get a year out of a pair of saw boots these days where a few years back 2 years was fairly reasonable. Believe me I'm not working any harder than I was back then. 

 

The cynics might acknowledge that its simply not good business to make a product last too long, but when you're paying around £200 a pair I don't think it's unreasonable to expect a decent life span. 

Thank you for your feedback, when developing boots we are constantly listening to customer feedback, and then we can take into consideration factors such as durability, performance, comfort, flexibility, weight, cost and aesthetic to deliver a range that meets the requirements of the market.

In reality we as a manufacturer have to balance many of these factors when producing a pair of chainsaw boots, we can easily improve durability by increasing leather thickness, sole density etc, but we then potentially add weight and decrease flexibility, as well as often adding cost.

We totally understand that cost and longevity are 2 of the most important factors, and will continue to try and ensure we deliver quality boots that deliver value for money over time.

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