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Nicholas Pearson

Inonotus Dryadeus fungus in a huge Oak

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Hello,

 

I took this picture this morning, the Oak is on the side of a village green, the canopy spreads well over both lanes of the road which runs beside the green. it is in reach of a kids play ground and the main trunk is about 8 foot in diamiter.

 

Also i should mention that the Oak is dieing back about 4-6 feet all over the canopy.

 

What i was woundering is, has anyone got any pictures or tales of the damage this fungus can cause.

 

I would like to be fully armed with all the knowlege before i talk to the owners.

 

cheers.

IMG00022-20120814-1336.jpg.436b95812b1a46b0de7528276d579cf2.jpg

IMG00023-20120814-1336.jpg.5cc5405ae238997df401afc5b90391f5.jpg

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Don't worry, i have been called in because they are wanting all the die back removed as bits are falling off onto the play area.

 

As i have never come across this fungus before i don't know a huge amount about it. I'm researching as we speak.

 

i will give the ancient tree forum a go as well.

 

but if you have any experience with this fungus and its management I'm all ears.

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Best way to manage this tree and fungus IMO is to remove the dieback to the healthy growth and do so over a number of years (every 2-5 years depending how quickly it is dying back) and make coronet cuts where possible to turn it into a nice oak pollard.

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Best way to manage this tree and fungus IMO is to remove the dieback to the healthy growth and do so over a number of years (every 2-5 years depending how quickly it is dying back) and make coronet cuts where possible to turn it into a nice oak pollard.

 

That was my idea. i think it has lost it 4-6 feet over two years so its happening rather quickly.

 

not a huge fan of coronet cuts. i can see there benefits but i much prefer to leave an eco pile.

 

two other questions, if the owners are wanting to replant near the Oak so when the time comes the new trees should be big enough what species would be best obviously not oak.

 

Secondly can this fungus spread as the whole hedge line has mature oaks in and a random tulip.

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That was my idea. i think it has lost it 4-6 feet over two years so its happening rather quickly.

 

not a huge fan of coronet cuts. i can see there benefits but i much prefer to leave an eco pile.

 

two other questions, if the owners are wanting to replant near the Oak so when the time comes the new trees should be big enough what species would be best obviously not oak.

 

Secondly can this fungus spread as the whole hedge line has mature oaks in and a random tulip.

 

You can plant oak again if you wish that fungus has probably been in that tree for over 30 years judging by body language in the picture. The joys of Inonotus dryadeus is the fungus rots but the host tree can adapt quicker and put on more wood than the fungus can "eat/chew through". Feel free to check out this sadly closed thread about how to manage said tree.

 

http://arbtalk.co.uk/forum/fungi-pictures/29509-inonotus-dryadeus.html

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Agree with above, from a SE US view. it may be more aggressive here, but I've seen, and managed, trees ringed round with conks. The gradual pruning approach sounds reasonable, and I agree that smooth cuts to concentrations of vitality make sense.

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Im not sure you should be taking/giving tree safety advice based on a few pictures shared over the internet. If there are concerns on the stability of the tree i suggest you get someone in to assess the root collars and undersides of the roots. Also track back along the worst affected roots as decay can sometime affect the roots a little away from the stem too. It would be usefull to know how big the tree is and the extent of any previous pruning works. Has there been any other root disturbance close by?

 

Its not normally a particularly threatening fungi in my experience, but a few photos online really isnt enough to give you a reliable assesment of risk

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Im not sure you should be taking/giving tree safety advice based on a few pictures shared over the internet. If there are concerns on the stability of the tree i suggest you get someone in to assess the root collars and undersides of the roots. Also track back along the worst affected roots as decay can sometime affect the roots a little away from the stem too. It would be usefull to know how big the tree is and the extent of any previous pruning works. Has there been any other root disturbance close by?

 

Its not normally a particularly threatening fungi in my experience, but a few photos online really isnt enough to give you a reliable assesment of risk

 

absolutely.:thumbup1:

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