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Hi there, I'm hoping to buy a flat in a small Victorian conversion. Last week they cut down a mature ash tree and and a bay tree all within 5metres from the house. The bay tree caused subsidence to the flat but has not caused the need for underpinning. Tie bars have been put in outside damaged wall. The ash tree caused subsidence to house over the back. The trees cut down to a stump in one go and to be treated ie poisoned but not sure if done that or not yet. My concern is.. Thst this may cause heave. I understand best not to kill all off in one go so hope not treated roots yet I'm waiting on answer from owner. Also doesn't it mean that its more difficult to get a mortgage even though they provided certificate of structural adequacy. As surveyor however cannot guarantee that heave or movement won't happen. I've been looking for over a year now and really like the flat. Does it also mean though it's not market value anymore. I offered ten thousand less but was rejected. 

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14 minutes ago, Ambersm said:

Hi there, I'm hoping to buy a flat in a small Victorian conversion. Last week they cut down a mature ash tree and and a bay tree all within 5metres from the house. The bay tree caused subsidence to the flat but has not caused the need for underpinning. Tie bars have been put in outside damaged wall. The ash tree caused subsidence to house over the back. The trees cut down to a stump in one go and to be treated ie poisoned but not sure if done that or not yet. My concern is.. Thst this may cause heave. I understand best not to kill all off in one go so hope not treated roots yet I'm waiting on answer from owner. Also doesn't it mean that its more difficult to get a mortgage even though they provided certificate of structural adequacy. As surveyor however cannot guarantee that heave or movement won't happen. I've been looking for over a year now and really like the flat. Does it also mean though it's not market value anymore. I offered ten thousand less but was rejected. 

Heave is only a potential issue if the trees predate the building and the soils have certain attributes. Phased reductions do nothing to reduce the incidence of heave, either way.

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Not enuff info but will wade in anyway. Tree removal often gets carried out regardless of actual processess involved. Are you on shrinkable clay?  Best check first ( from engineers bore hole / test hole results) i have seen reported clay on top of gravel beds  ( foundations weren't dug deep enuff)  K

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