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spandit

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About spandit

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  • Location:
    Deepest, darkest East Sussex
  • Interests
    burning/shooting/swearing

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  1. You'll probably find that splits at the fork - it's one of the ways they propagate (the fallen branch touches the ground and takes root) but mine will, in a good year, put on about 12 feet of growth. The pieces are broomhandle thickness and great for firepits or outdoor cooking (once dry)
  2. Oh, I'll have a look - didn't see an obvious way to lock it so I can get some torque on it
  3. Looking at the head of mine (Castor Power 26), it has a c.20mm square drive to the back of the bump head - haven't seen blades that will fit this, unless there's an adaptor out there
  4. I haven't tried that but don't think it would make it cut through clumps of sedge. It's not breaking the line, just shrugging it off. I bought a Jet Fit head for my smaller strimmer but since inheriting the bigger, straight shaft one, I haven't used it Anyone used the swing type blades? 6 Teeth Blade Trimmer Cutter Head Tool Steel Grass Lawn Mower Garden Strimmer UK WWW.EBAY.CO.UK Shape: 6 Teeth. Ice Cube Mold. Material: Manganese Steel. Height: Approx. Product Information. Sofa Cover...
  5. Do these blades fit most strimmers? I have one with a bump head and it's pretty good but I never get to bump it as tend to hit something that just snaps the line off (and it's fairly thick c.4mm stuff). Got a ditch full of pendulous sedge and although the top leaves are no match, where they get clumpy, the plastic line does little
  6. Personally, I'm thrilled as it means I can ditch the L-plates and tow the small trailer (c.1 tonne) behind the Hilux without "supervision" from my wife who passed her test a few months before I did in 1996. Can't believe the no reversing HGV test, though, that seems a bit foolish.
  7. My robinia trees are about 7 years old and mostly doing quite well but I've never had any flowers from them. Is this because they're not old enough? I also have some sea buckthorn that has never produced berries. I notice my almond is bare of fruit this year...
  8. Lit mine yesterday just to cheer things up a bit. Crazy weather.
  9. I lit mine this morning. Cheers the room up and helps dries the dogs. We have to have the windows open to lessen the smell from my elderly incontinent father's room 🤢 and it's bloody cold
  10. I didn't in the end. Realised that I actually like the gorse - it's a good barrier, evergreen, flowers all year round and after cutting it back, it's growing bushier. This is on the top bank of my pond, South facing. Petals are browning off a bit but the foliage is still green. Despite the council's assertions, natural regen seems to be my preferred route - plenty of birch, oak and willow coming up, with the occasional alder (spread from trees I planted, as there were none here when we moved in). All good for wildlife, as far as I can see. I have plenty of habitat piles around too, although the mother-in-law would rather I just burn it all and have the grass clipped to look like Astroturf.
  11. My gorse is looking pretty splendid around my pond - it's all naturally regenerated and providing good dog-proof cover so hoping some of the wildlife the pond attracts will actually stay. It has been really cold and wet this year so far but it's pretty tough stuff so should bounce back, I hope
  12. spandit

    Jokes???

    Is it safer to tow Land Rovers backwards then?
  13. spandit

    Jokes???

    If only terrorists drove Land Rovers more often - we'd have far fewer attacks as they'd be spending half their time fixing the damn things
  14. Love the smell of freshly cut bracken... I bought, at great expense, a DR Power 26" brushcutter - not a lot that stops it. You can hire Billy Goat mowers or similar which will do for tree planting. For a wildflower meadow you'll need to cut and collect the grass to reduce fertility.

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