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How would you use a Logrite Logging Arch?

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We've been selling the American Logrite Arch for a few years now to all manner of customers, but no Horse Loggers yet. Quite a few dropped by our stand at the APF show and we chatted about the options.

 

Now that we are working directly with Logrite in the US, we want to explore how the Arches can be adapted for Horse logging. What would work best for you, an Arch that attaches to a 2" tow ball on a dolly/single axle cart? Or perhaps a custom made adapter for poles? Any suggestions?

 

Here are some examples of the Arches being used in the US for Horse logging.

These are a standard Fetching Arch with Tow ball option (top photo) and the dedicated ATV Arch for towing (bottom photo)

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archandhorse400.jpg

 

Looking forward to hearing some of your thoughts.

 

Regards,

David

Orion Heating & Renewables Limited, Essex

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Hi David,

 

I looked at your arches a couple of years back but ended up going for a custom made option in the end.

 

I like to use a pole arch to completely suspend saw-logs so that we can keep them clean. This is much better than using a horse-drawn forwarder in my opinion for big timber as it avoids loading issues. I have used them for a single horse in combination with a Scandinavian timber arch, and with a pair with a swingletree. It allows us to move large timber with very little ground damage through tight sites.

 

157380d1401043368-show-us-your-logging-horses-matt-roy-pole-arch-2013.jpg

 

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Generally something that can lift a little over 30 inch (75cm) diameter is about right for our horses, we don't often handle bigger timber than that. I'd want something that could handle 2000kg+, which would allow us to move a 6m Oak log with a 75cm mid-diameter. Having said that we generally tend to work small tight woodlands, SSSI's, steep and wet sites, and generally use single horses as a result, so need something that is also light and manoeuvrable enough for a single too when necessary, and can be put into final position over the log by and single person, and as narrow as possible.

 

In an ideal world it would also incorporate some sort of braking system, so that it would be possible to help slow the log during a decent so the horse does not take all the weight or risk being rear-ended by it. This could be as simple as a block that rubs on the tyres, or even better drum brakes with the ability to partially set them (slowing rather than locking the wheels).

 

It would also be able to break-down into small enough sections that it could be loaded into the back of a flat-bed pick up so it can be transported in the towing vehicle with the horses in the trailer.

 

That's how we work anyway, although I am sure that others will do things differently!!

 

If you do get something made up and need it testing then let me know, we're only down the road! :biggrin:

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Hello. Thank you so much for the detailed reply. Logrite have been refining and improving their arches for a long time now, so the strength, quality and reliability is second to none. It would be great if we can find a suitable package for UK Horse Logging.

 

Based on the Log sizes and weights you describe, the obvious contender from Logrite is their T30 Tractor Arch, shown here in it's intended role behind a tractor. All the required bits are there, and I'll look into how easily it can be modified for other roles.

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More info here Tractor Arches T30 and T36 - LogRite Tools LLC.

 

Otherwise if 25" logs and 2000lb in weight was sufficient you have the Fetching Arch shown here towing a big log;

logarchhickory.JPG

More details of the standard arch here;Fetching Arch - LogRite Tools LLC

 

To perform the role of your custom made Silver Arch would only require small modifications to turn a Logrite into a basic "log suspender". As you are already using the Swedish arch to keep the nose up on sensitive or soft ground, the role of the big arch is pretty simple. I was thinking that modifications would have to incorporate all the 'horsy fixings' for want of a more appropriate term.

 

I've asked Logrite to comment on braking systems as you suggest. Any other thoughts are much appreciated. Thanks for the offer to trial products in future, we'll see where this goes.

 

Regards,

 

David

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Well done David for asking the right questions, it's good to see Logrite on a good footing in this country. We fabricated our own arch using the (pre Logrite branding) Future Forestry Products arch as inspiration- way back before there was a European presence.

 

I've only used arches behind vehicles, it'll be interesting to see what people are looking for.

 

W

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Just in case it helps anyone who is doing a home fabrication job on an arch-

 

(If you are looking for sturdy hubs with easily found bearings and lots of wheel and tyre choice)

We used the rear hubs from a drum braked Vauxhall (Astra, Nova, etc going back a few years now) to make our arch. They were the one of the few hubs in the scrapyard that was easy to get off and then re-attach to our steelwork. They are each held on with 4 big allen bolts.

I also got them because they had the same 4 stud wheel pattern as a pair of small Kubota flotation tyres that I'd been given. In the end we found that the standard Vaux wheel was more than adequate for some substantial pulls on sensitive ground.

If you're feeling keen about brakes, then the drums are quite handy as the cable would be quite easy to work from.

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Know this is an older post .. but wanted to chime in .. tz1_1zt the first photo you posted is me. well it's my arch and a good friend was driving the team( hard to believe he's 82) I only had one horse at the time and she was not up to the task ... the skid was just about 1/3 of a mile mostly up hill and it was hot .. those horse's had no problem pulling those big oak log and like you i am a dealer for Logrite and the arch you see there also has custom shafts that fit the Logrite fetching arch for a single horse .. nice to see other using arch's with horse's ..

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Know this is an older post .. but wanted to chime in .. tz1_1zt the first photo you posted is me. well it's my arch and a good friend was driving the team( hard to believe he's 82) I only had one horse at the time and she was not up to the task ... the skid was just about 1/3 of a mile mostly up hill and it was hot .. those horse's had no problem pulling those big oak log and like you i am a dealer for Logrite and the arch you see there also has custom shafts that fit the Logrite fetching arch for a single horse .. nice to see other using arch's with horse's ..

 

Great to hear from you vtlogger. I seem to remember that your photo turned up in a google search, it's amazing whats out there when you go searching.

 

I like the set up you have in that photo, do you call that a for-cart or dolly? With two horses you have a very versatile and powerful piece of kit there, how much weight is there in that cart? I'm guessing that you are using the Drop Tongue onto a ball hitch and coupling to the back of that cart.

 

Is it your arch in the logrite brochure with shafts attached, how well that that work? I imagine it's only good for flat ground because downhill it could cause problems if the horse trips.

 

We've been working with Tammy and Kevin to make the Pole Arch attachment for the Fetching arch, some photos here; Horse Logging - OrionForestry.co.uk. It works much like the setup in your photo, the log is wound up into the arch on a cable. The nose end of the log is then drawn by another smaller Scandinavian arch or swingle tree.

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Over here we call it a forcart. Yes it worked awesome.. its the fetch with a drop tongue like you said, and yes the single horse set up is the one and as of now only one out there ..It work really well and even down hill. I just let the log down so it drags. so far it s worked out fine.. i know that a few horse loggers have asked about a pole the you could hitch to a team and put a seat on the arch to ride on ..?? not to sure if i like that idea at all ..I like what you done with the Scandinavian arch .. there was a guy over here that had one of those..pretty cool i do have to say

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