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Dave110

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  1. A very useful response, thank's. I have no experiance with degrees or chartered certification (i have been lucky and managed without) so this is all good information.
  2. I completely agree, that is the reason both my theoretical applicants have extensive experience actually cutting and working in the wood. I am very firm in my belief that any form of manager or consultant will need to have served their time on the tools, to really understand silverculture and forest planning. The thing is that in our current times many employer's want a degree over practical experiance. I have worked with many forest managers/head foresters that are fantastic, they started out on a saw and worked into the 'pen & paper' management side of things. I have also worked for many terrible types who generally go via their text book through lack of practical understanding... It seems the general view of those who have posted is that hands on experiance trumps degrees and fancy letters? I agree but im not sure how wide this view is as i see more and more roles requiring a degree and pushing out the practical worker who has served their time and done things the right way (in my opinion).
  3. I completely agree, that is the reason both my theoretical applicants have extensive experience actually cutting and working in the wood. I am very firm in my belief that any form of manager or consultant will need to have served their time on the tools, to really understand silverculture and forest planning. The thing is that in our current times many employer's want a degree over practical experiance. I have worked with many forest managers/head foresters that are fantastic, they started out on a saw and worked into the 'pen & paper' management side of things. I have also worked for many terrible types who generally go via their text book through lack of practical understanding... It seems the general view of those who have posted is that hands on experiance trumps degrees and fancy letters? I agree but im not sure how wide this view is as i see more and more roles requiring a degree and pushing out the practical worker who has served their time and done things the right way (in my opinion).
  4. I have a question for those of you who are in a role that will involve recruitment in the forestry sector. For example the role could be for an assistant forester, head forester or even to aid selecting a consultant. Lets say you have 2 applicants who both have extensive practical - 'on the tools'- forestry experiance and can also do tasks such as management plans and survey work. One of them has a BSc or Msc (degree) and the other is a chartered forester with no degree; who do you go for? In short; what will make you more employable, academically, a degree or chartered status? I would appreciate your thoughts. For the record this is purely out of interest after a recent discussion at work, i dont have 2 applicants waiting on your responses!! Cheers, Dave
  5. Hi all, Do any of you have any recent experiance with Bangor's Forestry MSc, distant learning, course? I would like some feedback from previous students. Cheers, Dave
  6. Happy New Year all. Has anyone used the helly hansen overalls, 'Alta Suit' (not the quilted winter type)? These come in at about £50. I am after a new pair of unlined overalls that are water resistant, not too much of a sweat bag but can do me crawling around on/under muddy or wet machines. Usually have a lump of cow mat i can put down but still get covered at times. Cheers
  7. Had a discussion over out bait today, one of the lads is in need of a new work vehicle (freelance hand cutter/estate worker). Whats the preferred forestry vehicle? We have a fair selection here at the moment; pick ups, a defender and a Clio (!). It's difficult to decide on an ideal vehicle - dont necessarily need large pickups if your just carting tools, saws and fuels around. Having said that its grand to keep a vehicle smelling fairly fresh and not have loads of stinking kit loose in the cab/car with you... Thoughts?
  8. Appreciate all your input. Looks like I am going for the super cab - friendly keeper down the road let me have a nose at his, with 2 child seats in. Disco idea was a good one but a pick up is a must as I'm not sharing a cab with some of the stinking loads I need to carry! Cheers
  9. Many thanks for your input gents. I shall post again if the tractor ends up being purchased. Cheers
  10. Morning all, I appreciate there are many threads on this but none answer my questions.. To those running crew cabs and super cabs ('1.5' cabs). What is the actual difference in bed length. From what i can see an average crew cab bed is 5 foot and a super cab type has an extra 8 inches on that? I know super cab axles are positioned better for weight distribution but do the 2 models vary in overall vehicle length much? Modern crew cabs look long and numb. I need a new truck, must be 4x4 pick up, but it will need to do the occasional school run. Has to be a crew or super (hopefully with suicide doors) but it pains me,coming from a single hi-cap 110, that it looks like i cant even sit a digging bar or stock post flat in the back!! I'm not an arb so chip capacity isnt an issue, it will be on estate and forest duties, though bed space is still important for logs and materials - when a trailer isnt in play. Any help appreciated, Dave
  11. Appreciate all the responses. Steering drawbars do make life easier! Sounds like I am correct in thinking it would be a useful piece of kit still. Any photos of county forwarding set ups? Thanks again
  12. Hi all, A question for the County owners and operator's.... In the past I ran a 764 as a winch tractor, Igland 5000 and a blade on the front. For its age (and lack of mod cons) it was an excellent machine. I have heard a whisper that a machine I know (unsure of model) is coming up for sale. The machine in question also has a highland bear roofmount crane. Are the County's with roof mount any more stable than other newer machines? Will the tractor unit and a trailer for forwarding be unproductive on sites other than clearfell? Whilst i know County's are actually very nimble machines I cant see them doing well with a trailer on anything but a gentle turn.. Any input appreciated or just post some images of your County set ups! I also know there are other machines available and they are brill but its about budget for me. Thanks
  13. Afternoon all, Could I have some input on what chainsaw trousers, type A, your all using at the moment. I am nursing mine along and they need replacing. I currently use stein and Arbortec Breathflex's. I am looking at a pair of Arbortec Breathflex Pro's or Stein Krieger Guardian's. They worth the money? Cheers
  14. Morning all, I am looking to get back onto the freelance scene to fill 2 - 3 days a week. I have spent the past 10 years as a climber and hand cutter. I climb and fell safely, professionally and to a high standard. During my career so far I have been involved in most types of arb/forestry work and have used a variety of equipment, machines and appliances. I can think for myself, am mechanically minded, have a sense of humour and enjoy my work. If you need a hand then please private message me on here or call my mobile, 0798 6894 012, to discuss things further and in more detail. References available, if required. Cheers, Dave
  15. Thanks guys, I have been keeping busy but will always need more work and contacts. I'm not fussy and just want to pay the bills and stay outside. Pete, nice to hear from you although the landy comment could have been worded better . Thanks for keeping in touch, may finally be moving into the new place in a week or so!!!

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