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fagus

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  1. Agree with Khriss, dead wood is valuable and part of the food cycle.
  2. Google tree preservation order (TPO) for basic information. You, or the previous property owner, will have been notified of a the placing of TPO on any tree. Essential to make sure of a trees protection status before undertaking authorising any work to a tree. Your Local council will also have records or TPO's in its area; and likely have Tree Officer or Planning officer who could assist you.
  3. His record so far is probably enough to get rid; but you will need to have evidence that you cautioned him about his poor performance. If you consider not have serious talk with him which you document and a give him a copy explaining to him it is a warning which could result in the end of his employment. One of that could be gets himself to work. Discuss what he needs to do to improve to your satisfaction; setting out the outcome if improvement is not made and set a time limit (two weeks ?) for these improvements to take place. Let him know if improvement is satisfactory. It is lax to let poor conduct go unchallenged - he can turn round and say I have done this for months and a you never said anything i,e. you have condoned it- which weakens your actions.
  4. It is prudent for an Local authority to have a TPO tree evaluation form of qualifying criteria, there are some on the web. In case of objection, and if asked by a Council Member, it is essential to be able say why a tree was considered worthy of a TPO. The answer it is a nice tree has surely long gone.
  5. What Swinny says. Judiciary says to Complainant, Have you any evidence that wildlife was disturbed by the action taken. Complainant, Err no, but I have seen birds in the vicinity. Judiciary- so you have no evidence to back up your claim. Complainant Err no. Judiciary- Claim dismissed Good to document what you did with site photographs i.e. Before undertaking the work a wildlife survey, including an aerial inspection, was undertaken and no evidence was seen that any wildlife would be disturbed. As work progressed care and observations were taken to ensure evidence of wildlife had not been missed. Bats can be tricky as any cavity or bark fissure can be used as roosts and large cavities could need mirrors even a bat expert to decide.
  6. It is poverty of vocabulary, worse said - even worse written down. Though I am guilty of saying it at times.
  7. Can you justify/explain £450, in terms of hours worked, equipment rates and use; I reckon you will be asked about it if you go to Court. Photo evidence showing extent of the work would be good. If you can show price build up go for it. You will get peace of mind and a decision if nothing else rather than a bitter story for the rest of you days.
  8. I think it is more practical; in that in the time without leaves the build up of food in the plant remains, probably increased as the roots are unharmed. When conditions are good again there is a flush of nutrients into the available buds. Bit like a fallow period in a field where nitrogen from rain builds up until the new crop gets hold of it-leading to an improved yield than before.
  9. The irony is not lost that the grubbing out of hedges was government funded in the past and then lots of hedgerow replanting under stewardship schemes was also government funded. There has been lots planted and the new hedges have more species than the old Enclosure hedges. However the isolated trees do look forlorn. "Farmers who supply the Co-op have made over 1,000 miles (1633 km) of hedgerows, which help boost the environment and protect local habitats.One-hundred devices have been planted on farms to encourage wildlife into their natural habitats, including the introduction of bird boxes, bee hives and beetle banks. We might be learning.
  10. Leaves on the subject shown have herbicide damage.
  11. I think Hippophae salicifolia, what daltontrees says.
  12. More than often than not the highways authority do not own the land contained by roads and verges but have established -mostly inherited from old toll roads/ parish rights for highways- i.e the right of the public to pass and repass over the land -this often has existed for centuries. The subsoil is still with the adjacent landowner and that is what a big tree is mostly in. LA's will only have the title deeds for land they have purchased for new roads and improvements and will usually maintain they only own trees they have planted. As we know maintenance of highways is through different legislation.

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