Jump to content

Treeation

Member
  • Content Count

    449
  • Joined

  • Last visited

1 Follower

About Treeation

  • Rank
    Senior Member

Recent Profile Visitors

The recent visitors block is disabled and is not being shown to other users.

  1. Trees been ring barked....I have seen aspen in the woods recover from being ringbarked... we used to ringbark them to leave standing deadwood for habitat, been amazed a few times when we have returned a few months later to see the tree has bridged the gap and carried on living. Disgusting behaviour and Id be asking them to pay for removal. Surely that's tresspass as well as vandalism. Tbh the garden would have become completely dominated by a cedar like this which is only about a tenth of the size that it could potentially grow. Its not a suitable tree for small gardens and is more suited to parkland, large gardens, arboretums etc...I think you probably would of ended removing it in the next decade or 2 once it started becoming ginormous
  2. Who decided the "remedial works"? Were their defects in the tree noted? not sure it needed any other than a tidy up broken branches etc... Reduction looks harsh, tree looks likes its been topped rather than reduced... too many stub cuts and took too much off in my opinion.....big pruning cuts on horse chestnut equals rapid decay....could of reduced wind loading but taking much less off... Horse chestnuts respond well so should be ok, but as said before those stub cuts will puke out regrowth that will need managing in no time at all.
  3. No! And forgotten what i had to say now doh!
  4. Not much to go on there as photo only shows limited crown but looks as normal
  5. Agree the survey isnt suited for arborists. Also agree with what your trying to promote and i think we could all make our business a little more green if we tried which is a positive step forward but we have our limits. First question is a little simplistic for my liking - arboriculture is a much wide array of just removing carbon sinks using fossil fuels. Take into account planting, surveying, pruning, bracing, propogation, woodland management all important aspects of Arb too!.
  6. Hi mike ive got a fair bit of cedar and cypress which has been down from 1-3years. So its semi seasoned. . Its in varying rings and lengths on manageable. Im close to gloucs. I would have to deliver and can do 3cubic metres a time. Wouldnt want a lot for it just a bit to cover my time and fuel. If you interested pm me
  7. Treeation

    Help!!!

    It looks like copper plum, 100mm of wood chip/mulch under the canopy footprint will alleviate compaction from digger and is generally a great thing to do for any tree as adds nutrients, improves soil aeration and moisture retention. You could also add maxi crop fertiliser which is an organic fertiliser made from seaweed extract. Should be able to get it online
  8. What sort of quality are u after? Hardwood cord? Of are you happy with softwood rings?
  9. I wouldnt rely or necesarily trust what a customer tells me in relation to tree tpos or con areas, theres a lot of confusion around the matter. As a professional your job is to check the legalities so i always check myself before i undertake a job and sometimes before i have even get to site to quote. 5 shires gives sound advice on how to check for restrictions.
  10. Hi all, Stark times ahead and being in the tree business we are pretty landlocked to what we can do arboriculturally speaking. Anyone have any serious ideas how to lessen the blow? My approach as a SE sole trader running mainly domestic arb work and tree surveying has been to: 1. Keep my website/google business updated with ongoing changes due to coronavirus to let my customers know what we are doing and when we will next update. 2. I have made it clear that we are very much open for contact via email and telephone calls - Although a lot of people wont be spending now, they will be spending a great deal of time in their gardens so might have questions re. treework and it will be possible to quote/estimate some jobs by photos & emails/videocalls...which at least sows the seed for possible future work. 3. I am offering a video call arb consultancy service on an hourly rate for larger projects payments to be made via BACS - god knows if Ill get any interest but nothing to lose. 4. If we cant invest in our businesses, invest in your knowledge...get those tree books of the shelf and get learning now is a brilliant time to build on your knowledge base. I have been really enjoying brushing up on Mattheck and Lonsdale. 5. Will be looking to Sorn works truck and to see how onging payments can be managed. 6. Keeping a keen eye on SE deal through government. Hope this helps to some
  11. Hi all, Stark times ahead and being in the tree business we are pretty landlocked to what we can do arboriculturally speaking. Anyone have any serious ideas how to lessen the blow? My approach as a SE sole trader running mainly domestic arb work and tree surveying has been to: 1. Keep my website/google business updated with ongoing changes due to coronavirus to let my customers know what we are doing and when we will next update. 2. I have made it clear that we are very much open for contact via email and telephone calls - Although a lot of people wont be spending now, they will be spending a great deal of time in their gardens so might have questions re. treework and it will be possible to quote/estimate some jobs by photos & emails/videocalls...which at least sows the seed for possible future work. 3. I am offering a video call arb consultancy service on an hourly rate for larger projects payments to be made via BACS - god knows if Ill get any interest but nothing to lose. 4. If we cant invest in our businesses, invest in your knowledge...get those tree books of the shelf and get learning now is a brilliant time to build on your knowledge base. I have been really enjoying brushing up on Mattheck and Lonsdale. 5. Will be looking to Sorn works truck and to see how onging payments can be managed. 6. Keeping a keen eye on SE deal through government. Hope this helps to some
  12. If heave is a serious threat, I believe you should contact an arboricultural consultant first to assess impact of removal and to assess the trees condition so you are able to make an informed decision as there could be quite a lot at stake and for the cost of a survey to be undertaken it would be a good investment in my opinion. It may be a reduction in height say 40% will stabalise the tree and reduce the likelihood of failure considerably without having any heave issues but bear in mind the ongoing costs of re-reducing in hieght say every 5 or so years..judging by the a picture I would suggest a ball park figure of £300-£500 to reduce in height and remove green waste from site although access and regional variations need to be considered.
  13. There seems to be limited eveidence that anything other than a huge crown reduction would have an impact of decreasing root growth...this would kill the spruce anyway and look horrendous
  14. Spruce are forestry trees and grow absolutely huge...annaul expansion of the base of the trunk will be pushing the wall in 10years or so....wrong tree in the wrong place

About

Arbtalk.co.uk is a hub for the arboriculture industry in the UK.  
If you're just starting out and you need business, equipment, tech or training support you're in the right place.  If you've done it, made it, got a van load of oily t-shirts and have decided to give something back by sharing your knowledge or wisdom,  then you're welcome too.
If you would like to contribute to making this industry more effective and safe then welcome.
Just like a living tree, it'll always be a work in progress.
Please have a look around, sign up, share and contribute the best you have.

See you inside.

The Arbtalk Team

Follow us

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.