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Beardie

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About Beardie

  • Rank
    Senior Member
  • Birthday 23/01/1971

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  • Location:
    Swindon
  • Interests
    Recumbent bicycles

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  1. The rich are largely to blame for climate change. In other news, fire is hot, water is wet and bears crap in the woods.
  2. Interesting point. Biochar has no nutrient value of its own; the value of it is the dense honeycombe-like internal structure, which gives it a very high surface-area-to-volume ratio. The practical upshot is that nutrients from other sources soak in and stay available to plant roots for much longer. Whether this works as well with artificial fertilizers is something I don't know.
  3. I tried to follow the links that NorfolknGood put up. The first goes to a chainsaw carver's website. The second is a dead link and the third was blocked by my service provider. The fourth just links back to this thread, despite appearing to be a Facebook link. None appear to have any relevance to the issue raised. Maybe the user name describes these links, if you say it out loud.
  4. Certainly gluing a plug in it is not the way to go. It just seals in the rot.
  5. It's early days. Carry on watering through dry spells and make sure they are staked rock-solid in the ground. It will take the rest of the growing season for them to find their feet, so to speak, so don't be surprised if they look much the same for the next year or so. Large transplants take a lot longer to settle in than small ones and if the rootballs were disproportionately small, it just makes things worse. But it's not a failure just yet.
  6. Difficult to tell when it's in that state. Looks like you've got a nice bit of industrial archaeology going on though, where is this?
  7. Beardie

    Olameter

    Looks like some sort of caliper, how is it supposedto work? Search results for 'Olameter' only turn up a public services company in the USA.
  8. Don't hold your breath, even for a big tree like that. Finding a market for one-off trunks is difficult at the best of times, economies of scale and all that. Also, monkey puzzle is full of sticky resin, so it's not the most pleasant to process and handle.
  9. Stuff and nonsense. We'll carry on as we are. The Sub-aqua Logging Company resists all attempts at change!
  10. Do I see some hair-like structures lurking by the terminal buds? Then it's aTurkey Oak. Reminds me of doing some volunteer work for the Avon Wildlife Trust and we were admiring this huge oak at the end of a day's work. Bit dismayed when we realised what sort of oak it was. It's very invasive of grassland and the AWT often has to arrange scrub clearance parties to deal with it.
  11. A full load of hedging stakes and binders ready for extraction.
  12. The thickest one has strong medullary rays, suggesting oak, but oak usually has heartwood and sapwood clearly defined, which I can't see here. I would suggest that the tiny little bit of cherry is not worth bothering with, as it is too short to be practical, also it incorporates a branch union, which complicates matters.
  13. Pretty sure it's sea buckthorn, Hippophae rhamnoides. Next autumn, expect heavy crops of orange berries full of vitamin C, but sour enough to pucker your mouth inside-out.
  14. Yes, I was hoping to see more on the horselogging and hedgelaying sections in particular. I don't have much to do with either currently, maybe there are more people like me than I suspected.
  15. 1.1m thick? REALLY?? That's awfully thick for a cherry, especially as it's only 5m tall. More likely it's 1.1m girth, which would make it about 35cm thick. A picture would be amazing. Anyway, the most likely way for a tree to cause damage is through 'heave' resulting from the roots drawing water from near the foundations. You only get that with clay soils, and even then 9m is a very long way for roots to go. I reckon you'll be OK.

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