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Sal

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  • Content count

    83
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  • Last visited

About Sal

  • Rank
    Senior Member, Raffle sponsor 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

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  • Location
    Middlesex & Bucks
  1.  

    <p>Hey Chris</p>

    <p> </p>

    <p>I hope all is good with you. Far be it from me to exploit someone else's knowledge *ahem*, but I figured that if anyone had the info, it would be you. I'm looking for a paper/reference-able information about Massaria of plane, specifically regarding the apparent latent nature of the fungi. I've found plenty of papers in German, but I'm a little rusty and Google Translate isn't up to the task. Any pointers gratefully received. </p>

    <p>All the best <img src="<fileStore.core_Emoticons>/emoticons/smile.png" alt=":)" srcset="<fileStore.core_Emoticons>/emoticons/smile@2x.png 2x" width="20" height="20" /></p>

     

  2. ArbDogs? Pics!

    This is our new girl. 3yr old rescue who came to us 2 weeks ago. We're all still getting to know each other, and there's some work to be done, but she's coming along nicely. Arb dog in the making. Although when she 'stands up', she looks like a man in a dog suit.
  3. FdSc Arboriculture (On-line)

    Finished the FdSc earlier this year & to answer you questions: -How long do you spend per day doing the work? Same as Andy, a couple of hrs a night plus a good chunk of the weekend. I've just started another online course which I stay late after work to do so that I can make use of their extensive Arb library! -How does the videoconferencing part of the course work? will i have to get a camera?? Didn't have to use video conferencing/webcam for our project proposal, just used Powerpoint with narration (may be a new feature of course?) -And do employers value an online degree in the industry as much as a normall one? I've found that my employer/others I speak with are usually very positive about the amount of self-motivation you have to use to study this way. Shows that you can manage your own time/prioritise workloads etc. The tutors can be very busy at times with multiple courses/years running at once, but emailing them directly and utilising the discussion boards as much as possible helps. Hope this is useful
  4. Copper beech fungus

    Quick observation (purely for my own interest, so apologies for the tangent). Why the lack of buttress on the one side? Previous girdling root? Just curious
  5. Park use questionnaire

    Thanks again to all of you who answered the questions/left comments. I have now collected the results and its been a huge help. All the best - Sal
  6. Park use questionnaire

    That's great! Huge thanks to all of you who have responded so far! Some interesting answers (and an emerging theme of dog poo!)
  7. Park use questionnaire

    If you have a couple of mins spare, I'd be grateful if you could complete a short questionnaire for my FdSc Arboriculture final year work project. It's 10 tick box questions about why people visit/don't visit parks and I will be collecting the results Monday evening (13th April). Thank you - Sal https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/ZTQFW2C
  8. Bee Query.

    Great advice, thank you. Would it be sufficient to nail/screw the ply just over the broken end and perhaps cover the cavity entrance with brash? Or cover the cavity with ply as well (with the hole drilled into it)?
  9. Bee Query.

    Possibly a random question. In one of our parks I noticed that a Beech had recently shed a large section. The remaining stem is to be monolithed, but the fallen section has a colony of honey bees which I am concerned that if left near the ground, will be vandalised/predated etc. Notwithstanding the prospect of being stung, we were talking about the possibility of resurrecting the fallen limb against the monolithed stem, but it would mean that the hive would be inverted as it was right near the union. Do bee hives have an upside-down? Will they otherwise re-locate this time of year? At this stage we are not sure whether to leave it alone, or try intervene if it will improve the situation for the bees. I may well drop a line to a local beekeeper on Monday, but thought I'd ask if anyone had experience of this kind of thing?
  10.  

    <p>Hello Sal</p>

    <p> </p>

    <p>interesting situation/dilemma</p>

    <p> </p>

    <p>I'm most certainly not a bee expert, but would think that it may be best to leave the hive section (although i like the idea of trying to resurrect it) so that they relocate naturally. (depending on alternative local suitable habitat)</p>

    <p> </p>

    <p>I think you should put it up on the Forum, would make an interesting thread (or add it to one of the other existing bee threads)</p>

    <p> </p>

    <p>May be worth PM'ing RDB logs as he has experience in moving bees</p>

    <p> </p>

    <p>regards</p>

    <p> </p>

    <p>David</p>

     

  11.  

    <p>Morning! </p>

    <p>I hope you don't mind me picking your brain, but I have a random question. I was too chicken to post on the forum, however yours was the input I wanted as you may have some thoughts/experience. In one of our parks I noticed that one of our Beech had shed a large section (the cobra had failed too). The remaining stem is to be monolithed, but the fallen section has a colony of honey bees which I am concerned that if left near the ground, will be vandalised/predated etc. We were considering resurrecting the fallen limb (it's a big'un) to the monolithed stem, but it would mean that the hive would be inverted as it was right near the union. It may be a bit early for this question (it is for me anyway), but do bees have an upside-down? At this stage we are not sure whether to leave it alone, or try intervene if it will improve the situation for the bees. I will try and attach photos. Failing that I could just man-up and post them to the forum!</p>

    <p> </p>

    <p>I hope you're well - Sally</p>

     

  12. elm yellows (EY) phytoplasma

    Interesting stuff. I'd not heard of this but have just downloaded some bits to read through. And I'm loving the new job Nick thank you. I hope all is good in Harrow
  13. Lone site working

    Hi Twigger, If I'm being honest, there has been the rare occasion that I have felt a little vulnerable when out inspecting trees in certain areas, especially when using the tablet, but I always, always let someone know where I'll be and when I'll be back. For me, I find that making myself extra visible (hi-viz, ID badge etc) and being confident in how I speak with people puts me at ease If I was ever removing trees alone (eg: in domestic gardens when the client was out), I had someone nearby who knew exactly where I was and I would ring them at regular intervals. This is not ideal I know, but my really point is to be in regular contact with someone who knows exactly where you are and when you'll be back. I take responsibility for my own safety and if I'm not happy with a situation, I don't put myself at risk, no job is worth that. In my personal experience however, it's been the guys who seem to be the target for the majority of any abuse. I hope this is helpful - Sal
  14. Land rover defender 130 tipper body....

    My 130 had a back from KMR too. Found them to be good quality and very reasonable.
  15. How far have you ran/cycled/swam today?

    Just 3 weeks left til the Great North Run. Did 11 miles today and the new trainers have made all the difference!

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