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So do you think the whole post structure is weakened by knocking them in, not just the top and bottom?

 

I know nasty chemicals were involved in the past. But it's amazing that our ancestors knew how to be effective with timber. Venice is not alone being built on piled alder, which last indefinitely in water. Nowadays we plant the cheapest trees, with fastest growth rates makes the worst timber. Then when someone gets hold of semi decent hardwood specimens the path of least resistance is taken and converted into hardwood logs.

The whole timber nurturing industry needs re-evaluating.im not the first to say so. Naff primary product affects the whole chain. Because you are planting for the next generation few risk it. Greedy offspring potentially scupper it.

As the golden droid said.

We're doomed

 

Yes, the whole post structure, hense the quick onset of rot at ground level.

I totally agree with the rest of your comments.

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To theorise then a day like today is perfect. I've been knocking 8ft 3-4 inch posts about 2ft into the ground for a pheasant rearing pen. It was wet after the recent rain and easy going. Some posts almost sunk to full depth when the hammer weight rested on them.

The gamekeeper also had creosoted the post bottoms. 👍.

 

It's such a variable game, soil type and moisture. Wood quality. Species, treatment, growth rates etc. It's really hard to research and if we did work it out for the best. A new animal containment system would be developed. But like British grown timber for the war efforts. Wood is now obsolete in navy ships and other hardware.

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A question for the Scottish delegation, I've been offered 4"cundie stobs, am I right in thinking these are just 4" non machine rounded posts or not. They come in at 15p per post more so it's not going to break the bank. I would consider treating the bottom of the posts if it prolongs the life of the fence line. I fully appreciate that our timbers arnt what they used to be. I've looked at the Hampton steel option and will send them a list although looking at the prices if I opt for this I will put longer runs with the longest being 300m using the wider netting.

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I work cundy, they are what I call rough rounds,

Now I'm willing to guarantee they are pine or spruce, the almost certainly won't be larch

 

Ive no issues with them I tell the customer who they are and leave them to decide if the want to go ahead.

What diameter my supplier does 2-3.5 inch , or 3-4 inch ones around 40p difference in cost.

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I'm not sure I agree with your hunch bob.

It's not the use of the post knocker that is the issue, just the horrendous quality / inconsistencies in post treatment.

 

I know plenty of dug in posts failing after 4-5 years. Also the point of most resistance would definitely be the end of the stake, not ground lèvel.

 

I use chestnut for all my fencing, aslong as it's winter cut it should be as good as oak. Price wise it's competitive aswel and it puts money bsck into forestry. Seems a shame for it to be chipped for biomass.

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I work cundy, they are what I call rough rounds,

Now I'm willing to guarantee they are pine or spruce, the almost certainly won't be larch

 

Ive no issues with them I tell the customer who they are and leave them to decide if the want to go ahead.

What diameter my supplier does 2-3.5 inch , or 3-4 inch ones around 40p difference in cost.

 

 

Been offered 3" machine peeled posts at £1.77 and 4" cundies at £2.10 so yes about 40p, given how exposed the fence line will be I'm edging towards the 4" cundies.

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Whatever posts you use don't skimp on the straining posts. I try and advise all my customers as they are the most important part of the fence and as long as they last the posts in the middle can be patched up as and when. I buy telegraph poles by the artic load and cut them to suit depending on the job and they work out good value. Failing that buy the best pressure treated creosote strainers you can buy, it will more than pay off in the future. Make sure your struts are creosoted too and if not use box strainers. And then I would use clipex inters, standard ones @ circa £4 every 4 metres is cheaper than wood every two and that will last for a long time! I am currently doing 10km of 9' 6-7" creosote strainers with clipex beefy posts every 2.5 metres which is overkill but one hell of a fence!

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I've a customer who has just changed policy to using gangridge creopost strainers, and normal.if,4 posts,

His thinking is the strainers have a 60 year lifespan and as long as they stay sound he is willing to sacrifice normal.posts, as long as strainers stay sound the integrity of the fence should remain high.

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I've tried and will keep trying for this.banging a fee stakes in is not a problem undoing a strainer and getting it right takes too long.

Customers think short term and save now that's the problem.

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I'm not sure I agree with your hunch bob.

It's not the use of the post knocker that is the issue, just the horrendous quality / inconsistencies in post treatment.

 

I know plenty of dug in posts failing after 4-5 years. Also the point of most resistance would definitely be the end of the stake, not ground lèvel.

 

I use chestnut for all my fencing, aslong as it's winter cut it should be as good as oak. Price wise it's competitive aswel and it puts money bsck into forestry. Seems a shame for it to be chipped for biomass.

 

I here what you are saying but with post knockers having ever increasing weight of hammer it is bound to have a detrimental effect on the cell structure of the post. I agree that some of the timber and the treatments are poor to say the least.

Chestnut is great but not cost effective to get it up here.

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