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A few more questions gents if you don't mind.

 

1. It's been suggested I use 3x3 square treated larch posts, which are comparable with round posts.

 

2. What about if I dip the round posts in a further preservative, ive this this at the a recent trade show.

 

3. I had considered clipex as they blend well into the landscape and a lot of the old fences on the higher hills were help up on old steel posts. I bet it's expensive to buy but cheaper on the labour.

Edited by timberbear

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1) March certainly better than pine try and get European March.

2)yes but it depends how much time to leave them soaking.

3) remember with clipex yes u can only use clipex net, look into stapleok the same idea but you can use conventional rylock, Hampton fencing sell it and I thought it was decent price.

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Now Bob, Que an advert for clipex!

 

No, not an advert for Clipex which to be honest is selling faster than we can get it and you will just slag it off without any real proof or experience of the product.

My question was genuine as I'm convinced that post knockers have a detrimental effect on posts as the cell structure is bound to be damaged particulary at ground level which is the point of most resistance.

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The timber is rubbish and the supplier will.look for any excuse to get out of being responsible,

James Jones rep told me there timber had the 15 yr lifespan,

But if you cut a notch for stay then it doesn't count, if you make a hole with staple then they won't stand good,

Any excuse that 15 year is total fallacy.

 

100% correct, the manufacturers guarantee is not worth the paper it is writen on. Having said that UC4 is the best timber on the market at presant, without going to Creosote, and it's lifespan should be in excess of 15 years.

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A few more questions gents if you don't mind.

 

1. It's been suggested I use 3x3 square treated larch posts, which are comparable with round posts.

 

2. What about if I dip the round posts in a further preservative, ive this this at the a recent trade show.

 

3. I had considered clipex as they blend well into the landscape and a lot of the old fences on the higher hills were help up on old steel posts. I bet it's expensive to buy but cheaper on the labour.

 

As GN says European Larch is great if you can get it but it's like "hens teeth". Japanese Larch is OK but nowhere near European. Scots Pine is great, slow growing and resiliant. Stay away from Spruce and Fir, total rubbish!

Clipex is not expensive and is about £3.05/m depending on terrain etc.

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I can't believe that you find maul easier to work than the hand thumper,

You posts far straighter than with maul,

Also maul splits head of posts, though apparently Mr storrs thinks we are peely wally ibn Scotland we don't have hard ground,

Well Mr storrs if you find yourself up this way ill take you to some "boys ground" see how you get on chief.

 

Not at all, I'm well aware of the ground conditions in Scotland having lived there for a while. However i still maintain if you are managing to get stakes in 2ft by hand to depth then you are on good ground. Getting a post into 'growan' is no easy feat and near on impossible by hand. Plus I always find doing it by hand damages the tops of the posts more than a knocker with a postcap .

 

I put in a load of clipex a while back, very pleasantly surprised how good it was and went into hard ground quite well really.

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No, not an advert for Clipex which to be honest is selling faster than we can get it and you will just slag it off without any real proof or experience of the product.

 

My question was genuine as I'm convinced that post knockers have a detrimental effect on posts as the cell structure is bound to be damaged particulary at ground level which is the point of most resistance.

 

Not saying your wrong at all.

I fence on the softer side of land. Don't really get rock that much. I have taken out posts that I've put in.

But unless it's been mushroomed on a foundation or such. The posts I've pulled out always seem OK and the tops may benefit from the pounding, being more compressed and repellent of moisture and fungi.

I think the real deterioration of timber is at the neck above and below ground level.

 

I'm currently using treated larch 9x9x 8ft sq posts. One I picked up today after been laid on the ground for about a month was covered in a white mildew(fungus) so I expect the treatments not up to much.

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Not saying your wrong at all.

I fence on the softer side of land. Don't really get rock that much. I have taken out posts that I've put in.

But unless it's been mushroomed on a foundation or such. The posts I've pulled out always seem OK and the tops may benefit from the pounding, being more compressed and repellent of moisture and fungi.

I think the real deterioration of timber is at the neck above and below ground level.

 

I'm currently using treated larch 9x9x 8ft sq posts. One I picked up today after been laid on the ground for about a month was covered in a white mildew(fungus) so I expect the treatments not up to much.

 

I'd bet the Larch posts were not European as they would last without treatment.

My point about where posts rot is at ground level i.e the point of most resistance.

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I'd bet the Larch posts were not European as they would last without treatment.

 

My point about where posts rot is at ground level i.e the point of most resistance.

 

 

So do you think the whole post structure is weakened by knocking them in, not just the top and bottom?

 

I know nasty chemicals were involved in the past. But it's amazing that our ancestors knew how to be effective with timber. Venice is not alone being built on piled alder, which last indefinitely in water. Nowadays we plant the cheapest trees, with fastest growth rates makes the worst timber. Then when someone gets hold of semi decent hardwood specimens the path of least resistance is taken and converted into hardwood logs.

The whole timber nurturing industry needs re-evaluating.im not the first to say so. Naff primary product affects the whole chain. Because you are planting for the next generation few risk it. Greedy offspring potentially scupper it.

As the golden droid said.

We're doomed

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No, not an advert for Clipex which to be honest is selling faster than we can get it and you will just slag it off without any real proof or experience of the product.

My question was genuine as I'm convinced that post knockers have a detrimental effect on posts as the cell structure is bound to be damaged particulary at ground level which is the point of most resistance.

 

Have u any evidence of this? Real scientific evidence looking throu a microscope at cell structures etc?

 

U also state ground level is the area of most resistance but surely ground level is only ground level for the last knock few knocks?

 

And is it just a modern problem with the larger knockers? I can remember using a kinghitter 20-25 years ago and there are far older versions than that albeit a lot lighter wieghts.

 

I'd say far more likely to be the type of treatment used now will have all the decent stuff taken out of it and the fact timber will generally be green/wet when it goes into the pressure tanks

 

 

For the OP personally i'm not a fan of sq posts and would use 31/2" rounds, saves u bothering with a turning bar getting all the posts square to net esp if stony ground.

 

With the PR disease u may struggle to find larch posts, i'd just go with spruce but from a decent old fashioned sawmill that dries the cut posts first.

 

The few times i've seen posts snap/rot prematurely tend to be small 3" and machine rounded, probably churned out of a big sawmill day after the logs came in

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