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A question for the Scottish delegation, I've been offered 4"cundie stobs, am I right in thinking these are just 4" non machine rounded posts or not. They come in at 15p per post more so it's not going to break the bank. I would consider treating the bottom of the posts if it prolongs the life of the fence line. I fully appreciate that our timbers arnt what they used to be. I've looked at the Hampton steel option and will send them a list although looking at the prices if I opt for this I will put longer runs with the longest being 300m using the wider netting.

 

You are bang on with your interpretation of Cundy posts. The are much better than machine rounds as the don't split like machine rounds. Please, please ask for a minimum of Class 4 posts or pressure treated Creo or opt for Clipex.

I work for a fencing supply company, if you need prices PM me and I'll get it sorted. If you need wider spacings use XFence as you can space at 4 to 6m.

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The issue many have with round posts is the staples falling out when posts dry and split,

I work barbed staples and I haven't found that to be an issue since.

 

Some of the round posts I get in a pack are real monsters some more on the spindly side, but usually make sure any spindly ones are either in a position with minimal pressure, or have a thicker one each side.

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Bob if wot ur saying is true that would mean posts in hard ground would rot quickier than posts in soft ground, and strainers should rot very quick (esp 8" gate posts as they get the most and largest chaps).

And u could probably argue in an awful lot of cases on decent ground a stab should not have any cell damage as in some cases with likes of a suma will just push the stab in with its mass alone almost with out being hit.

 

Must admit i almost never use machine rounds, i'd argue that will have a far bigger impact on post structure than anything, ur taking away the outside layer of timber which offeers some degree of natural protection.

 

I don't think i've ever had a post rot in 5 years and could go to plenty of 20+ yr old fences still standing fine.

I'd say it will be more a problem with ur big sawmills caring more about cost cutting than product.

Find urself a local smaller family/old fashioned sawmill (1 that cut then lets post dry befre treating) u will probably end up with a far better treated post from them

Some times therer not as dear as u think, and some would argue worth paying slightly extra to keeplocal business's going and if ur ever short of a few things can just pick them up.

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You are bang on with your interpretation of Cundy posts. The are much better than machine rounds as the don't split like machine rounds. Please, please ask for a minimum of Class 4 posts or pressure treated Creo or opt for Clipex.

I work for a fencing supply company, if you need prices PM me and I'll get it sorted. If you need wider spacings use XFence as you can space at 4 to 6m.

 

Do any commercial foresters use the Clipex fences?

 

I've often thought it a waste to erect fences, that will last 30 years, round a newly planted wood. After 10 years a tree is fairly resistant to sheep/ deer.

 

How does the Clipex fence compare in price to normal fencing?

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Bob if wot ur saying is true that would mean posts in hard ground would rot quickier than posts in soft ground, and strainers should rot very quick (esp 8" gate posts as they get the most and largest chaps).

And u could probably argue in an awful lot of cases on decent ground a stab should not have any cell damage as in some cases with likes of a suma will just push the stab in with its mass alone almost with out being hit.

 

Must admit i almost never use machine rounds, i'd argue that will have a far bigger impact on post structure than anything, ur taking away the outside layer of timber which offeers some degree of natural protection.

 

I don't think i've ever had a post rot in 5 years and could go to plenty of 20+ yr old fences still standing fine.

I'd say it will be more a problem with ur big sawmills caring more about cost cutting than product.

Find urself a local smaller family/old fashioned sawmill (1 that cut then lets post dry befre treating) u will probably end up with a far better treated post from them

Some times therer not as dear as u think, and some would argue worth paying slightly extra to keeplocal business's going and if ur ever short of a few things can just pick them up.

You obviuosly work wwith better quality than most. I speak to customers every day which are frankly severely p***ed off with posts rotting in less than 5 years.

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Do any commercial foresters use the Clipex fences?

 

I've often thought it a waste to erect fences, that will last 30 years, round a newly planted wood. After 10 years a tree is fairly resistant to sheep/ deer.

 

How does the Clipex fence compare in price to normal fencing?

 

Short answer is yes. We have supplied Clipex to numerous customers for fencing woodland.

Price is extremely competative at about £.30 - £0.50 pence per meter more for the initial cost but over the lifetime of the fence, less than half the price. You will also erect more per day.

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Also, my main gripe with the clipsx pricing claims is that they space them out to 4M+ to achieve that costing.

 

You can do that with timber posts, 4-5 rounds which are stronger in the ground and the price difference is larger.

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