Jump to content
Big Beech

Stock fencing

Recommended Posts

You said 150 for big gate , 100 for small,

 

 

And you quoted a £50 difference in the cost of the gate!! Where is your issue? We have both priced the jobs identical and you are arguing the case.

 

I do very little ag fencing, the majority is for my own animals so have a damned good idea regarding livestock behavior. Anything big I will contract out and concentrate on what I am good at as I don't have the kit to make money on long lengths.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Reading all this is making me glad that I hate stock/wire fencing and avoid it where ever I can and stick to garden fences and mucked in post and rail!

 

Although I currently have a quote out for 200 meters of bashed in post and rail that I priced as I would a domestic fence and when I convereted the price to a price in meters it came out to £3 a meter less than the NAAA average price.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Well your in for another shock wire prices set to rise,

 

Some manufacturers are saying prices will rise and some are saying the exact opposite!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Looks like we got some fun going on, and three pages!!

As it turns out, we have got the job. Man in charge was more interested in my "financial interests" rather than quibbling the costing. (Due to other reasons)

But I do have an understanding of live stock behaviour having been brought up on farms and worked on them as my wife did on her grandparents farm. And as a matter of interest, the chap who helps with my fencing is a fencer by trade and cut his teeth agricultural stock fencing for sheep in NZ as a kiwi himself so we know how not to do things!!

Thanks all for the input

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That's fine, my point is too many gardeners, buy a set of wire stretchers and immediately become fencers, without knowledge of animal behaviour I was brought up on farm ,and work at livestock marts for 20 years, and have livestock handling certificate,

 

Yet many gardeners who do fencing have none of the above. Yet still charge handsomely.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Althou knowing stock movement etc is not the be all and end all either, seen plenty of shoddy farmer put up fences to see that, and some of those boys contract out to others.

 

I read an fencing post/thread on here were a ad was pulling all his wire with his 4x4 or a ratchet strap

 

1 off my old bosses reckons the post knocker was worst invention ever for fencers, as know anyone can batter a strainer in and call them self's a fencer. Whereas pre chappers takes a bit of hard graft and skill to dig/pack strainers in by hand.

 

Out of couriosity how many of u stiil put seperate strainers and gate posts in? (ie 2 posts either side of gate, 12 to strain wire 1 to hang/slam gate)

Only 1 fencer in my area still does that and even he does not do it 100% the way he used to.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Wasn't using 2 posts needed for some grants a while ago? We don't do it ourselves since as long as you've got a decent post and strut they shouldn't shift much once the wires pulled anyway but we only do our own fencing.

 

One thing about fencing that always makes me laugh is that no 2 people do it the same. I like my struts dug in and notched a certain way to but others like them put against a stake for example. As long as the fence is strong and tight that's the main thing but every farmer / fencer I talk to likes things done a certain way.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ur quite right, 1 boss i worked for even insisted the way u tie of a net on a strainer, certain wire had to be below/above the line wire, made absolutely no odds to the fence

 

 

Most/all old school fencers in my area always put 2 posts and even had a stab near to gate post to take rails so gate posts were not connected to the strainers at all

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Althou knowing stock movement etc is not the be all and end all either, seen plenty of shoddy farmer put up fences to see that, and some of those boys contract out to others.

 

 

 

I read an fencing post/thread on here were a ad was pulling all his wire with his 4x4 or a ratchet strap

 

 

 

1 off my old bosses reckons the post knocker was worst invention ever for fencers, as know anyone can batter a strainer in and call them self's a fencer. Whereas pre chappers takes a bit of hard graft and skill to dig/pack strainers in by hand.

 

 

 

Out of couriosity how many of u stiil put seperate strainers and gate posts in? (ie 2 posts either side of gate, 12 to strain wire 1 to hang/slam gate)

 

Only 1 fencer in my area still does that and even he does not do it 100% the way he used to.

 

 

I still put two posts in at gateways but have also recently started using metal gate posts to save the trouble of having to replace them again any time soon.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Featured Adverts

About

Arbtalk.co.uk is a hub for the arboriculture industry in the UK.  
If you're just starting out and you need business, equipment, tech or training support you're in the right place.  If you've done it, made it, got a van load of oily t-shirts and have decided to give something back by sharing your knowledge or wisdom,  then you're welcome too.
If you would like to contribute to making this industry more effective and safe then welcome.
Just like a living tree, it'll always be a work in progress.
Please have a look around, sign up, share and contribute the best you have.

See you inside.

The Arbtalk Team

Follow us

×

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.