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Czlowiek Drzewo

Pricing fencing

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It always scares me the way that people use credit to buy stuff. I know it's been discussed before but what happens if the customer doesn't pay. It then means you can't pay the supplier. When I first started I used to get the customer to pay direct for materials. Now I take the risk. All I'm saying is be very careful. I got badly stung and it was an eye opener.

 

R

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Why is that Matt?

 

Just curious but ive recently just done a large fence job, got all materials on VISA, then returned all unused and got credited back.

 

You might find in the present climate, opening an account with any supplier is very difficult.

 

I found it made the whole experience very painless mate. I was often buying thousands of pounds of materials, helps when you have more than one job on the go as well.

 

Garth I agree a mtr rate is excellent on that kind of job. I did 1.5 miles o stock fencing for SWT on a day rate. Made a fortune ;-)

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It always scares me the way that people use credit to buy stuff. I know it's been discussed before but what happens if the customer doesn't pay. It then means you can't pay the supplier. When I first started I used to get the customer to pay direct for materials. Now I take the risk. All I'm saying is be very careful. I got badly stung and it was an eye opener.

 

R

 

To what point are you saying credit is risky? Using credit cards to purchase, putting materials on account, or simply turning upto a tree job with kit on finance with staff that need paying then the customer doesnt pay? All risky if you ask me!

 

Fortunately, the job i refer to was for the national grid. Got paid even before the visa bill came in!

 

I found it made the whole experience very painless mate. I was often buying thousands of pounds of materials, helps when you have more than one job on the go as well.

 

Sorry Matt, still dont see the difference, this contract was out of my area and couldnt get an account open with said "local" supplier, but they were happy to get payment up front on visa, then used them just like any other supplier with an account?

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Sorry for the derail, but as Matt says, get materials price, add 20-25%, add labour, but then i think i would add another chunk for profit/contingency.

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To what point are you saying credit is risky? Using credit cards to purchase, putting materials on account, or simply turning upto a tree job with kit on finance with staff that need paying then the customer doesnt pay? All risky if you ask me!

 

 

Yep I agree, and the most successfull businesses are normally the ones that have taken the biggest risks, just look at virgin and richard branson. At the end of the day it is all about risk management. I credit check all commercial customers before giving them terms, still nothing saying they won't go bump though. I did turn some work down for a firm once though as a result of this and it paid dividend.

 

Domestic customers are a different ball game entirely. Now I will only do a job if I have enough in the bank to cover wages and materials before I start. If I haven't then I will arrange stage payments so I can't lose out to badly.

 

As for kit on finance a good tool, however we have seen lots of people in the poo because of it. All about correct tools for the job, and each job is different...........

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Yep I agree, and the most successfull businesses are normally the ones that have taken the biggest risks, just look at virgin and richard branson. At the end of the day it is all about risk management. I credit check all commercial customers before giving them terms, still nothing saying they won't go bump though. I did turn some work down for a firm once though as a result of this and it paid dividend.

 

Domestic customers are a different ball game entirely. Now I will only do a job if I have enough in the bank to cover wages and materials before I start. If I haven't then I will arrange stage payments so I can't lose out to badly.

 

As for kit on finance a good tool, however we have seen lots of people in the poo because of it. All about correct tools for the job, and each job is different...........

 

All very good thinking as far as i can see:thumbup1:

 

The quotes i put forward are more hypothetical, and like doing so to make people think before they jump!

 

In my experience confidence goes a long way, but if you smell a rat, leave well alone:001_smile:

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I agree with you both, a happy balance is what's needed. I had supplier accounts with do very good timber merchants who helped me no end. VISA is just the same I suppose lol

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I got bumped on a site where I'd got terms with a supplier for the materials. Would have been a nice earner. Unfortunately the 90 days to pay the supplier soon came without any pennies from the job. Visa was the answer but it stung for a little while............

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My "general rule of thumb" also seems to be roughly the same amount for labour as materials (EVERYTHING including an extra 10% or so).

 

 

 

They are all good motors mate, if there is a concrete plant near you dig all your holes needs to be about 20 and go and get a half cube of concrete saves you mixing it by hand, its about £60 for a half cube so a bit dearer than hand mixing but saves a lot of time.

 

 

I like the thinking of the concrete route Rob, but how does it work practically? What do you do when the truck arrives & you got to take concrete to 20 holes to fill & level the posts, does it not go off before you've filled all the holes?

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My "general rule of thumb" also seems to be roughly the same amount for labour as materials (EVERYTHING including an extra 10% or so).

 

 

 

 

 

 

I like the thinking of the concrete route Rob, but how does it work practically? What do you do when the truck arrives & you got to take concrete to 20 holes to fill & level the posts, does it not go off before you've filled all the holes?

 

You have to collect that amount of concrete it would be far too expensive to get the jaeger to deliver,if it is the middle of summer and hot it goes off a bit quicker so just add some water, but it takes a while for it to be unworkable and it is only for posts, ive seen us having to break it out with a pinch bar then put it in the hole with some water added and it sets fine.

You could never do that if it was structural but for posts its fine:thumbup1:

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