Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
Czlowiek Drzewo

is ash good for milling?

Recommended Posts

it sure is, the problem is getting it on a trailer and taking it to suitable mill, lanarkshire hardwoods the only i know locally about 45 from Glasgow, with all the hassle sometimes cross cutting and firewooding seems easier

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Doh! Yeah sorry..got lazy while writing post.

 

I know it will mill! i am not planning to sell wood and its a nice piece so firewood would be a waste if its good for funiture making. Not planning to sell the millied timber ( will be cutting it on site ) just wondering if its any good for making tables etc. Is it good to for that?

 

cheers

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
PeteB   

mill it, stack, air dry it and it'll make some really sturdy furniture like kitchen "farm" tables etc. Twill be durable and weather resistant if used for outdoor use as well. Make good use of it!

 

I had planked a Lebanese Cedar years ago, promising to get a large kitchen table made from it (although Leb Ced is soft) the year it was ready and I had a big enough house, some kind person set fire to the lot!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
mill it, stack, air dry it and it'll make some really sturdy furniture like kitchen "farm" tables etc. Twill be durable and weather resistant if used for outdoor use as well. Make good use of it!

 

I had planked a Lebanese Cedar years ago, promising to get a large kitchen table made from it (although Leb Ced is soft) the year it was ready and I had a big enough house, some kind person set fire to the lot!

 

Why they burn you timber! assholes

 

Its rare i come across good timber for milling..had took down a lovely ,large and straight cherry about year ago and didn't have alaskan mill then..wasn't happy cutting it into discs on site. This time i am going to make sure i got a mill.

 

First time doing this so will have to research more about drying timber etc.

 

cheers

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Rob D   

That's the ideal situation for planking it on site with an Alaskan mill!! :001_huh:

 

Ash is a great timber although more for indoors rather than out. Even better if it has turned a lovely brown colour on the inside (called olive ash) if there has been the right sort of decay going on....

 

:laugh1:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

straight butts dont always get the premium prices, natural bends in certain timbers are sought after but knowing what and to whom seems the hardwood merchants secrets. there is a good site called scottish hardwoods worth a look at.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

Sign in to follow this  

  • Featured Adverts

About

Arbtalk.co.uk is a hub for the arboriculture industry in the UK.  
If you're just starting out and you need business, equipment, tech or training support you're in the right place.  If you've done it, made it, got a van load of oily t-shirts and have decided to give something back by sharing your knowledge or wisdom,  then you're welcome too.
If you would like to contribute to making this industry more effective and safe then welcome.
Just like a living tree, it'll always be a work in progress.
Please have a look around, sign up, share and contribute the best you have.

See you inside.

The Arbtalk Team

Follow us

Get in touch

facebook feed

Recent tweets

×