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Steve Bullman

Meetings with remarkable trees, the Arbtalk version

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Just now, The avantgardener said:

Great Oak tree but 40m+??? Think you need to check your measuring stick, that’s more than 10ft of growth per year.

Very true! I didn't do the maths on that one! 😂
My method was comparing it to the third house on the right! 😂 Gutters are 6m, perhaps more around 30m.

Will have to rec climb it now!

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Great post this. So pleasing to have a resource where such examples can be collected together. Some amazing trees here - so thanks Steve and all contributors.

I have a few more of my own from the archives to add shortly, but for now, take a look at this. I'm not sure that it counts as 'remarkable' and it may not even be a tree (though some sources elsewhere suggest it is roots - hence my posting). My initial - tentative - thought was that it could be Honey Fungus 'bootlaces', although it doesn't seem quite right.

 

 However, given the location, it's might be reasonable to say it's something seldom seen, so maybe worth an inclusion? Well I've been in several such mines and this is the only time i've seen anything like it anyway!

 

Observed underground gripping a huge boulder fallen from the ceiling of a 'gallery' in a disused Cotswold stone mine. At the surface (not many metres away) are mature Beech, Scots Pine and others.

See what you think. Opinions/thoughts welcome...

 

Thanks

Ben

 

 

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Not the most amazing tree you'll ever see, but worth a look:

the famous (in Heres/Glos area) 1,500 year old Yew in St Barts churchyard, Much Marcle. Take a pew inside. Hollowed be thy name.

Presumably in an effort to prevent them from breaking off under their own weight, many of the branches used to held up by huge chains on poles. This made for an interesting spectacle.  Disappointingly, these have since been replaced by a metal 'goalpost'-style framework.

  

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3 hours ago, Ben R said:

Not the most amazing tree you'll ever see, but worth a look:

the famous (in Heres/Glos area) 1,500 year old Yew in St Barts churchyard, Much Marcle. Take a pew inside. Hollowed be thy name.

Presumably in an effort to prevent them from breaking off under their own weight, many of the branches used to held up by huge chains on poles. This made for an interesting spectacle.  Disappointingly, these have since been replaced by a metal 'goalpost'-style framework.

  

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That is a bit of a corker 

 

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Ah! 🙁

This next one is unlikely to have been aired before as it's on the privately-owned farm where my mum grew up.

It's the first of two examples of mature Beech stoically coping with adversity. Both are from long-disused 'open caste' stone quarries.

Well anchored but leaning a bit and precariously straddling the edge of a large arch (big enough to drive a car through) left by workings.

The only time i've truly stood under a big tree. The whole thing i mean - canopy, trunk and roots.😉

 

 

 

 

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Thanks Steve. I loved your Facebook ones - amazing!

Here's the 'other one' which is situated close to the Cotswold Way National Path near Randwick in Standish Woods (F.C.), and therefore publically accessible.

Again, it's a Beech teetering at the top of a quarry pit.

This time though, quarrying and/or erosion have exposed the roots creating this huge, bizarre lattice-like 'bridge' anchoring the tree to the bank behind. You can walk under it if you stoop a little.

Meanwhile, a huge boulder (pic 4) has created a second headache on the opposite, quarry face side. To which the tree has responded in the manner of a heraldic hawk - by gripping it like a ball.  

I don't think i'm ever likely to hug a tree but think i'd consider giving this one a round of applause.😁 

Sorry there are so many pics but it was very difficult choosing which ones to include.

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Elm, seen in Brighton yesterday. BN1 postcode, was one of many I saw, how do they know they have DED? genuine question not an eco/enviro fueled rant. Also whats the idea behind ring barking it and leaving it standing?

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