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Andy Collins

Pics of your milled products

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its not..the seat and backpiece are separate but the legs were dug 2 ft in the same hole could have used a crosspiece to join the legs but didnt think it was needed.

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The first paid milling job!!! Well thats covered wages and the cost of the mill!!!!! Free planking from now on!

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My client is having a house built and the Cedar was right in the middle the planned driveway!! so now the Cedar is being turned into a dinning table with a little help from a joinery friend of his!!

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Re: The morticers, the Makita is the same as the much older Ryobi design and while they're good the main problem with them is they're bulky and you have to keep clamping them to the beam because of the way the chain runs - length ways. Most framing outfits use Mafell machines, german made, very expensive but worth it. I bought mine second hand off ebay, only the second one on there in two years of looking, luckily hadn't been abused like the ones at the firm I used to work for. The chain runs so that the machine will always pull itself to an adjustable guide rail, you just plunge and go, with a sharp chain and you can really crack on with them. (see pic) So much more powerful, easier and quicker to use than anything else. They also make very nice range of BIG wood working hand power tools, beam planers, portable circular saws (2ft blade for one man to operate can be a bit scary!). Min price for most of there kit new is 2K though, so you've got to need one! In fact the only bit of their kit I don't rate at all is the mobile bandsaw, and the carpenter's chainsaw, so I made my own...

 

At the other end of the scale is my 'brace-o-matic 9000' used for cutting curved wind braces, made with two bits of 4x2 and 2 bits of copper pipe, pushing the saw the wrong way so you can follow the pen line... works a treat.

 

One of my little framing elves made this bench last summer, didn't bother to finish it though as you can see!

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Braceomatic.jpg.0520a514a801432ac95ead5f48b17a79.jpg

Mafell.jpg.dbba9a60825ea98ccb5a45659d9f20ae.jpg

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Re: The morticers, the Makita is the same as the much older Ryobi design and while they're good the main problem with them is they're bulky and you have to keep clamping them to the beam because of the way the chain runs - length ways. Most framing outfits use Mafell machines, german made, very expensive but worth it. I bought mine second hand off ebay, only the second one on there in two years of looking, luckily hadn't been abused like the ones at the firm I used to work for. The chain runs so that the machine will always pull itself to an adjustable guide rail, you just plunge and go, with a sharp chain and you can really crack on with them. (see pic) So much more powerful, easier and quicker to use than anything else. They also make very nice range of BIG wood working hand power tools, beam planers, portable circular saws (2ft blade for one man to operate can be a bit scary!). Min price for most of there kit new is 2K though, so you've got to need one! In fact the only bit of their kit I don't rate at all is the mobile bandsaw, and the carpenter's chainsaw, so I made my own...

 

At the other end of the scale is my 'brace-o-matic 9000' used for cutting curved wind braces, made with two bits of 4x2 and 2 bits of copper pipe, pushing the saw the wrong way so you can follow the pen line... works a treat.

 

One of my little framing elves made this bench last summer, didn't bother to finish it though as you can see!

 

stupid question,

where you've attached ya blocks to the side of the bar, do they rub or slow the chain down?

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BigRedDog,

 

Now that is nice work in a style I love, built to last. Not sure what the visable five little black holes are.... I hope they are not screw holes? I allso love your work area, I am sure we will be talking down the road a bit as I have made many tables and benches over the years in a similar fashion.

Never can get enough money for the work and material involved, but it is rewarding and fun.

 

O'h and Plippy,

do you have a 2000x2000pixel image of your profile pic avail??

Edited by Doug

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Hey,

 

Sorry for not getting back to these questions sooner, only just figured out how to search through the threads I've posted in.

 

In answer to the Q's.

 

I forgot to mention one hidden part of the "Brace-O-Mactic 9000", on the inside of the bits of 4x2 are two little pads of 3mm hard board screwed on and sized so that the timber blocks are held ever so slightly off the bar and won't foul the chain. Similar in design to the blocks on the Alaskan mill. I was thinking of replacing them with little strips of Lead as once the get chain oil gets on them they do get a bit slippy to grip the bar. Not usually a problem as you tend to be keeping the pressure in one direction, but if it gets a bit technical it can require a bit of adjustment as you're going along. But I forgive it as it has the all important free factor.

The blocks are also shaped on the front side so that you can follow a pen line all the way to the chain. This saw runs the tiny pico chain, which is good for this type of curved work, would be even more manouverable with a carving bar.

 

Thanks for your comments Doug, I am very lucky indeed to work in such a beautiful spot, its not even my farm or anything to do with my family, but the guys who own it just like having someone around the place who's up to something all the time. So I'm very lucky indeed, keeping all my junk there and running two businesses from their buildings. Don't worry the little holes are 10mm dowel holes, no screws in our work! The lad who made that bench (Mike in the first picture) is even more wood fundamentalist than me! The sad thing is I can actually sell this sort of stuff at quite a good price, I just don't have enough time to make any myself, and there's nobody else locally doing the type of work I do. I've got to go and get some pics of a desk I made last year from beech I felled 5 yr ago, spalted in my yard (the most incredible colours!), then milled and machined up. I'll keep you posted.

 

Thanks Again.

 

Scampi.

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Ta for info on the mortice equipment. I don't have a clue as to which one is good/bad etc..... It's nice to have someone posting who knows about these things.....

 

 

:thumbup:

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